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Article: Cultural differences and similarities in request rejection: A situational approach

TitleCultural differences and similarities in request rejection: A situational approach
Authors
KeywordsAssertiveness
Cross-cultural comparison
Culture
Social behavior
Issue Date2008
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=197
Citation
Journal Of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 2008, v. 39 n. 6, p. 745-764 How to Cite?
AbstractUsing global measures, most studies have shown that Caucasian Americans were more assertive than Chinese. Adopting a situational approach, three studies were conducted to examine situational differences and similarities in request rejection, and its underlying mechanisms for Caucasian Americans and Chinese. Results revealed that (a) Caucasian Americans were more likely to reject requests of moderate legitimacy than Chinese; (b) both cultural groups were similar in request rejection in high- and low-legitimacy situations; (c) both cultural groups were more likely to reject a request when considering their needs and rights, but less likely to reject a request when considering their relationship with the requester; and (d) the self-model of request rejection was more salient for Caucasian Americans but the relational model of request rejection was more salient for Chinese in moderate-legitimacy situations. © 2008 Sage Publications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60745
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.795
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.308
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChun, WYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:17:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:17:39Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 2008, v. 39 n. 6, p. 745-764en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-0221en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60745-
dc.description.abstractUsing global measures, most studies have shown that Caucasian Americans were more assertive than Chinese. Adopting a situational approach, three studies were conducted to examine situational differences and similarities in request rejection, and its underlying mechanisms for Caucasian Americans and Chinese. Results revealed that (a) Caucasian Americans were more likely to reject requests of moderate legitimacy than Chinese; (b) both cultural groups were similar in request rejection in high- and low-legitimacy situations; (c) both cultural groups were more likely to reject a request when considering their needs and rights, but less likely to reject a request when considering their relationship with the requester; and (d) the self-model of request rejection was more salient for Caucasian Americans but the relational model of request rejection was more salient for Chinese in moderate-legitimacy situations. © 2008 Sage Publications.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=197en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectAssertivenessen_HK
dc.subjectCross-cultural comparisonen_HK
dc.subjectCultureen_HK
dc.subjectSocial behavioren_HK
dc.titleCultural differences and similarities in request rejection: A situational approachen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-0221&volume=39&spage=745&epage=764&date=2008&atitle=Cultural+differences+and+similarities+in+request+rejection:+A+situational+approachen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheng, C:ceci-cheng@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, C=rp00588en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0022022108323808en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-53349129253en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros153418en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-53349129253&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage745en_HK
dc.identifier.epage764en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000259956000006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, C=7404798168en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChun, WY=7005883835en_HK

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