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Article: Psychological Resilience and Dysfunction Among Hospitalized Survivors of the SARS Epidemic in Hong Kong: A Latent Class Approach

TitlePsychological Resilience and Dysfunction Among Hospitalized Survivors of the SARS Epidemic in Hong Kong: A Latent Class Approach
Authors
Keywordsdisaster
epidemic
resilience
SARS
Issue Date2008
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/hea.html
Citation
Health Psychology, 2008, v. 27 n. 5, p. 659-667 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To examine trajectories of psychological functioning using latent class analysis on a sample of hospitalized survivors of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in Hong Kong. Design: A longitudinal study of 997 survivors, recruited from among 1,331 individuals hospitalized for SARS, were interviewed at 6, 12, and 18 months after hospitalization. Main Outcome Measures: Psychological and physical functioning at each time point was measured using the 12-item Medical Outcome Study Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). Results: Four latent classes were identified-chronic dysfunction, delayed dysfunction, recovery, and resilience. All groups had better physical health than the chronic group. Resilient and recovered individuals had greater social support and less SARS-related worry, and resilient individuals were more likely to be male. The resilient group also had greater social support than the delayed group and better physical functioning than the recovered group. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that longitudinal outcome trajectories following a major health-threat event in an Asian sample bear close resemblance to prototypical trajectories observed in trauma studies using Western samples. Unique predictors of the trajectories included factors observed in previous studies, such as social support, as well as factors of particular relevance to a major disease outbreak, such as SARS-related worry. © 2008 American Psychological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60733
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.611
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.915
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBonanno, GAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, JCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, RSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CKYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, VCWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:17:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:17:25Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHealth Psychology, 2008, v. 27 n. 5, p. 659-667en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0278-6133en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60733-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine trajectories of psychological functioning using latent class analysis on a sample of hospitalized survivors of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in Hong Kong. Design: A longitudinal study of 997 survivors, recruited from among 1,331 individuals hospitalized for SARS, were interviewed at 6, 12, and 18 months after hospitalization. Main Outcome Measures: Psychological and physical functioning at each time point was measured using the 12-item Medical Outcome Study Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). Results: Four latent classes were identified-chronic dysfunction, delayed dysfunction, recovery, and resilience. All groups had better physical health than the chronic group. Resilient and recovered individuals had greater social support and less SARS-related worry, and resilient individuals were more likely to be male. The resilient group also had greater social support than the delayed group and better physical functioning than the recovered group. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that longitudinal outcome trajectories following a major health-threat event in an Asian sample bear close resemblance to prototypical trajectories observed in trauma studies using Western samples. Unique predictors of the trajectories included factors observed in previous studies, such as social support, as well as factors of particular relevance to a major disease outbreak, such as SARS-related worry. © 2008 American Psychological Association.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/hea.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Psychologyen_HK
dc.rightsHealth Psychology. Copyright © American Psychological Association.en_HK
dc.subjectdisasteren_HK
dc.subjectepidemicen_HK
dc.subjectresilienceen_HK
dc.subjectSARSen_HK
dc.titlePsychological Resilience and Dysfunction Among Hospitalized Survivors of the SARS Epidemic in Hong Kong: A Latent Class Approachen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0278-6133&volume=27&issue=5&spage=659&epage=667&date=2008&atitle=Psychological+Resilience+and+Dysfunction+Among+Hospitalized+Survivors of+the+SARS+Epidemic+in+Hong+Kong:+A+Latent+Class+Approachen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SMY: munyin@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SMY=rp00554en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/0278-6133.27.5.659en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18823193-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-54849405510en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros152697en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-54849405510&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume27en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage659en_HK
dc.identifier.epage667en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000259350300018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBonanno, GA=7101685888en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SMY=25722730500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JCK=23090202000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, RSY=8507083800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, CKY=55437572900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CPY=25626993100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VCW=8503496500en_HK

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