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Article: Floral biology, breeding systems and population genetic structure of three climbing bauhinia species (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) in Hong Kong, China

TitleFloral biology, breeding systems and population genetic structure of three climbing bauhinia species (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) in Hong Kong, China
Authors
KeywordsBauhinia championii
Bauhinia corymbosa
Bauhinia glauca
Hong Kong
ISSR
Lianas
Population genetic structure
Reproductive biology
Issue Date2009
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TRO
Citation
Journal Of Tropical Ecology, 2009, v. 25 n. 2, p. 147-159 How to Cite?
AbstractThe pollination ecology, breeding system and population genetic structure of three climbing Bauhinia species B. championii (4 populations, 23 individuals), B. corymbosa (2 populations, 25 individuals) and B. glauca (8 populations, 76 individuals) were studied in Hong Kong, southern China. We hypothesize that the climbing Bauhinia species will attract targeted pollinators to achieve out-cross success and high levels of self-incompatibility will be expected to maintain diversity, with local population expansion relying on vegetative propagation. All three species have inflorescences consisting of numerous small, pale, fragrant flowers, which show diurnal anthesis. Field observations revealed that all three species are predominantly pollinated by bees (particularly Apis mellifera) and butterflies (Graphium and Papilio species), although B. championii is also pollinated by wasps and flies. Bauhinia corymbosa and B. glauca have sucrose-dominant nectar, whereas B. championii has hexose-dominant nectar. In controlled-pollination experiments fruit and seed set were generally highest following artificial out-crossing. The index of self-incompatibility of B. championii is 1.07, indicating self-compatibility; B. corymbosa and B. glauca were obligately self-incompatible. The population genetic structure and variation of the Bauhinia species was investigated using ISSR markers. Generally the three species have moderate within-population (mean HS = 0.206) and high among-population genetic variation (mean GST = 0.284). No correlation exists between the geographical and genetic distance, possibly due to the small local population size. All three species showed high levels of heterozygosity as expected for predominantly out-crossing long-lived K-selected species. Copyright © 2009 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60717
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.975
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.569
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, CPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, RMKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRamsden, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:17:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:17:04Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Tropical Ecology, 2009, v. 25 n. 2, p. 147-159en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0266-4674en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60717-
dc.description.abstractThe pollination ecology, breeding system and population genetic structure of three climbing Bauhinia species B. championii (4 populations, 23 individuals), B. corymbosa (2 populations, 25 individuals) and B. glauca (8 populations, 76 individuals) were studied in Hong Kong, southern China. We hypothesize that the climbing Bauhinia species will attract targeted pollinators to achieve out-cross success and high levels of self-incompatibility will be expected to maintain diversity, with local population expansion relying on vegetative propagation. All three species have inflorescences consisting of numerous small, pale, fragrant flowers, which show diurnal anthesis. Field observations revealed that all three species are predominantly pollinated by bees (particularly Apis mellifera) and butterflies (Graphium and Papilio species), although B. championii is also pollinated by wasps and flies. Bauhinia corymbosa and B. glauca have sucrose-dominant nectar, whereas B. championii has hexose-dominant nectar. In controlled-pollination experiments fruit and seed set were generally highest following artificial out-crossing. The index of self-incompatibility of B. championii is 1.07, indicating self-compatibility; B. corymbosa and B. glauca were obligately self-incompatible. The population genetic structure and variation of the Bauhinia species was investigated using ISSR markers. Generally the three species have moderate within-population (mean HS = 0.206) and high among-population genetic variation (mean GST = 0.284). No correlation exists between the geographical and genetic distance, possibly due to the small local population size. All three species showed high levels of heterozygosity as expected for predominantly out-crossing long-lived K-selected species. Copyright © 2009 Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TROen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Tropical Ecologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Tropical Ecology. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectBauhinia championiien_HK
dc.subjectBauhinia corymbosaen_HK
dc.subjectBauhinia glaucaen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectISSRen_HK
dc.subjectLianasen_HK
dc.subjectPopulation genetic structureen_HK
dc.subjectReproductive biologyen_HK
dc.titleFloral biology, breeding systems and population genetic structure of three climbing bauhinia species (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae) in Hong Kong, Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0266-4674&volume=25&spage=147&epage=159&date=2009&atitle=Floral+biology,+breeding+systems+and+population+genetic+structure+of+three+climbing+Bauhinia+species+(Leguminosae:+Caesalpinioideae)+in+Hong+Kong,+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, RMK: saunders@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailRamsden, L: lramsden@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, RMK=rp00774en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityRamsden, L=rp01484en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0266467408005762en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69749122085en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154530en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-69749122085&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage147en_HK
dc.identifier.epage159en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000264212400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CPY=35077701800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaunders, RMK=35345489600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRamsden, L=6603549232en_HK

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