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Article: Detached aquaculture buoys in the SE Pacific: Potential dispersal vehicles for associated organisms

TitleDetached aquaculture buoys in the SE Pacific: Potential dispersal vehicles for associated organisms
Authors
KeywordsBuoys
Chile
Dispersal
Floating plastics
Fouling communities
Non-indigenous species
Rafting
Succession
Issue Date2009
PublisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/ab/ab-home/
Citation
Aquatic Biology, 2009, v. 5 n. 3, p. 219-231 How to Cite?
AbstractThroughout the world's oceans a wide variety of floating plastics are found, among which buoys stand out for their high floatability and diversity and abundance of associated organisms. Between 2001 and 2005, we conducted 25 ship surveys in the Bay System of Coquimbo (BSC), during which we registered 34 detached buoys floating between 1 and 45 km from the coast. The objective of this study was to infer the possible origin of these buoys, identify the associated biota and characterize their biological traits. Short-term drift experiments (30 min) showed that buoys without rope responded primarily to the velocity and direction of the wind, while buoys with ropes (3 m length) followed surface currents. Using the wind velocity and direction during the 12 h before capture of the detached buoys, we estimated the hypothetical trajectories of these buoys during that time period. Results indicated that most buoys originated from aquaculture facilities in the BSC. A total of 134 different species from 14 phyla was found on 18 anchored (91 species) and 22 detached (116 species) buoys sampled. Community composition was similar among buoys - 54% of all species were common for anchored and detached buoys - but a higher number of rare species occurred on detached buoys. Buoys do not seem to lose but rather gain organisms after detachment. The most common functional groups on these buoys were mobile species, suspension-feeders and species with sexual reproduction, separate sexes, internal fertilization and direct or very short larval development. Fouling communities on detached buoys were mostly in advanced successional stages, comprising diverse species (including several non-indigenous species) adapted to the conditions at the sea surface. These results suggest that floating buoys may transport associated species over extensive distances, thereby also contributing to the spread of non-indigenous species. © Inter-Research 2009.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60700
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.773
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAstudillo, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBravo, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorDumont, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThiel, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:16:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:16:45Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAquatic Biology, 2009, v. 5 n. 3, p. 219-231en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1864-7782en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60700-
dc.description.abstractThroughout the world's oceans a wide variety of floating plastics are found, among which buoys stand out for their high floatability and diversity and abundance of associated organisms. Between 2001 and 2005, we conducted 25 ship surveys in the Bay System of Coquimbo (BSC), during which we registered 34 detached buoys floating between 1 and 45 km from the coast. The objective of this study was to infer the possible origin of these buoys, identify the associated biota and characterize their biological traits. Short-term drift experiments (30 min) showed that buoys without rope responded primarily to the velocity and direction of the wind, while buoys with ropes (3 m length) followed surface currents. Using the wind velocity and direction during the 12 h before capture of the detached buoys, we estimated the hypothetical trajectories of these buoys during that time period. Results indicated that most buoys originated from aquaculture facilities in the BSC. A total of 134 different species from 14 phyla was found on 18 anchored (91 species) and 22 detached (116 species) buoys sampled. Community composition was similar among buoys - 54% of all species were common for anchored and detached buoys - but a higher number of rare species occurred on detached buoys. Buoys do not seem to lose but rather gain organisms after detachment. The most common functional groups on these buoys were mobile species, suspension-feeders and species with sexual reproduction, separate sexes, internal fertilization and direct or very short larval development. Fouling communities on detached buoys were mostly in advanced successional stages, comprising diverse species (including several non-indigenous species) adapted to the conditions at the sea surface. These results suggest that floating buoys may transport associated species over extensive distances, thereby also contributing to the spread of non-indigenous species. © Inter-Research 2009.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/ab/ab-home/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAquatic Biologyen_HK
dc.rightsAquatic Biology. Copyright © Inter-Research.en_HK
dc.subjectBuoysen_HK
dc.subjectChileen_HK
dc.subjectDispersalen_HK
dc.subjectFloating plasticsen_HK
dc.subjectFouling communitiesen_HK
dc.subjectNon-indigenous speciesen_HK
dc.subjectRaftingen_HK
dc.subjectSuccessionen_HK
dc.titleDetached aquaculture buoys in the SE Pacific: Potential dispersal vehicles for associated organismsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1864-7782&volume=5&spage=219&epage=231&date=2009&atitle=Detached+aquaculture+buoys+in+the+SE+Pacific:+potential+dispersal+vehicles+for+associated+organisms.+en_HK
dc.identifier.emailDumont, CP: dumont.clement@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDumont, CP=rp00692en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/ab00151en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68049102996en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros155854en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-68049102996&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage219en_HK
dc.identifier.epage231en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267411800002-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAstudillo, JC=30067483000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBravo, M=30067573500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDumont, CP=13407874500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThiel, M=35231340100en_HK

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