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Article: Effect of phenolic compounds on the pasting and textural properties of wheat starch

TitleEffect of phenolic compounds on the pasting and textural properties of wheat starch
Authors
KeywordsPasting
Phenolic compounds
Texture
Wheat starch
Issue Date2008
Citation
Starch/Staerke, 2008, v. 60 n. 11, p. 609-616 How to Cite?
AbstractPasting and textural properties of wheat starch were systematically investigated in the presence of 25 phytochemicals including phenolic acids, flavonoids, coumarins, still-benes and tannins with a wide structural diversity. Overall, most of these phenolic compounds significantly changed functional properties of starch, Trans-cinnamic acid increased the peak viscosity most by 37 RVU whereas catechin decreased it most by 14 RVU. All the phenolic compounds considerably increased the breakdown with the greatest effect by chlorogenic acid (135 RVU) and the least by chrysin (6 RVU). Escu-letin caused the maximum increase in setback (38 RVU), and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid caused the maximum decrease (103 RVU). All the phenolic compounds significantly reduced the peak time with the greatest effect by frans-cinnamic acid. Chrysin and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid most increased and decreased the hardness of starch gels stored at 23°C for 48 h by 3.9 and 24.2 g. Most of the phenolic compounds increased the adhesiveness with the greatest effect by 3-hydroxybenzoic acid (72 g.s). pH changes of the starch suspension caused by the addition of phenolic compounds and their structural diversity affected these functional properties of wheat starch to different extents. This study may provide a basis for the use of phytochemicals in functional and starch-based staple foods. © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60689
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.523
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.513
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCai, YZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorCorke, Hen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:16:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:16:33Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationStarch/Staerke, 2008, v. 60 n. 11, p. 609-616en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0038-9056en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60689-
dc.description.abstractPasting and textural properties of wheat starch were systematically investigated in the presence of 25 phytochemicals including phenolic acids, flavonoids, coumarins, still-benes and tannins with a wide structural diversity. Overall, most of these phenolic compounds significantly changed functional properties of starch, Trans-cinnamic acid increased the peak viscosity most by 37 RVU whereas catechin decreased it most by 14 RVU. All the phenolic compounds considerably increased the breakdown with the greatest effect by chlorogenic acid (135 RVU) and the least by chrysin (6 RVU). Escu-letin caused the maximum increase in setback (38 RVU), and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid caused the maximum decrease (103 RVU). All the phenolic compounds significantly reduced the peak time with the greatest effect by frans-cinnamic acid. Chrysin and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid most increased and decreased the hardness of starch gels stored at 23°C for 48 h by 3.9 and 24.2 g. Most of the phenolic compounds increased the adhesiveness with the greatest effect by 3-hydroxybenzoic acid (72 g.s). pH changes of the starch suspension caused by the addition of phenolic compounds and their structural diversity affected these functional properties of wheat starch to different extents. This study may provide a basis for the use of phytochemicals in functional and starch-based staple foods. © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofStarch/Staerkeen_HK
dc.subjectPastingen_HK
dc.subjectPhenolic compoundsen_HK
dc.subjectTextureen_HK
dc.subjectWheat starchen_HK
dc.titleEffect of phenolic compounds on the pasting and textural properties of wheat starchen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCai, YZ: yzcai@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSun, M: meisun@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCorke, H: harold@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCai, YZ=rp00661en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySun, M=rp00779en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCorke, H=rp00688en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/star.200800024en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-56449092621en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros158390en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-56449092621&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume60en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage609en_HK
dc.identifier.epage616en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000261440500002-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhu, F=35306203800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCai, YZ=8684149300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, M=7403181447en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorke, H=7007102942en_HK

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