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Article: Differences in uptake and translocation of hexavalent and trivalent chromium by two species of willows

TitleDifferences in uptake and translocation of hexavalent and trivalent chromium by two species of willows
Authors
KeywordsBioremediation
Chromium
Hexavalent chromium
Translocation
Trivalent chromium
Uptake
Willows
Issue Date2008
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0963-9292
Citation
Ecotoxicology, 2008, v. 17 n. 8, p. 747-755 How to Cite?
AbstractUptake and translocation of chromium (Cr) by two willow species was investigated. Intact pre-rooted weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) and hankow willows (Salix matsudana Koidz) were grown hydroponically and spiked with hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] or trivalent chromium [Cr (III)] at 25.0 ± 0.5°C for 120 h. Removal of leaves was also performed as a treatment to quantify the effect of transpiration on uptake and translocation of either of the Cr species. Although the two willow species were able to eliminate Cr (VI) and Cr (III) from the hydroponic solution, significant differences in the removal rate for both chemical species were observed between the two willows (p < 0.05): faster removal rate for Cr (III) than Cr (VI) was detected in both willow species; hankow willows showed higher removal potential for both chemical species than weeping willows. Remarkable decreases in the removal rates for both Cr species were detected in the willows with leaves removed (p < 0.05). The results from the treatments spiked with Cr (VI) also revealed that Cr was more mobile in plant materials of hankow willows than that in weeping willows (p < 0.01), while higher translocation efficiency of Cr was observed in weeping willows than hankow willows for the Cr (III) treated (p < 0.01). However, a convincing decrease in the translocation efficiency due to the removal of leaves was only observed in the treatments spiked with Cr (VI) (p < 0.05). Substantial differences existed in the distribution of Cr species in plant materials after exposure of either of the chemical forms: roots and lower stems were the major sites for accumulation in weeping willows exposed to Cr (VI) and Cr (III), respectively; in contrast roots were the only sink in hankow willows exposed to both chemical species. The capacity of willows to assimilate both Cr species was also evaluated using detached leaves and roots of both willow species in sealed glass vessels in vivo. The results indicated that detached roots showed a more remarkable capacity to remove Cr (III) from the hydroponic solution than Cr (VI) (p < 0.01). Although detached leaves of both willow species were able to efficiently eliminate Cr (III), neither of them reduced the concentration of Cr (VI) in the solution. The results suggests that different mechanisms for uptake, assimilation and translocation of Cr (VI) and Cr (III) exist in different willow species and phytoremediation of Cr should consider this factor for the proposed target effectively. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60668
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.329
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.108
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grant CouncilCAG HKUST 3/04C
Funding Information:

This work was supported in part by CAG HKUST 3/04C from Hong Kong Research Grant Council.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, XZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXing, LQen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:16:10Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:16:10Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEcotoxicology, 2008, v. 17 n. 8, p. 747-755en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0963-9292en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60668-
dc.description.abstractUptake and translocation of chromium (Cr) by two willow species was investigated. Intact pre-rooted weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) and hankow willows (Salix matsudana Koidz) were grown hydroponically and spiked with hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] or trivalent chromium [Cr (III)] at 25.0 ± 0.5°C for 120 h. Removal of leaves was also performed as a treatment to quantify the effect of transpiration on uptake and translocation of either of the Cr species. Although the two willow species were able to eliminate Cr (VI) and Cr (III) from the hydroponic solution, significant differences in the removal rate for both chemical species were observed between the two willows (p < 0.05): faster removal rate for Cr (III) than Cr (VI) was detected in both willow species; hankow willows showed higher removal potential for both chemical species than weeping willows. Remarkable decreases in the removal rates for both Cr species were detected in the willows with leaves removed (p < 0.05). The results from the treatments spiked with Cr (VI) also revealed that Cr was more mobile in plant materials of hankow willows than that in weeping willows (p < 0.01), while higher translocation efficiency of Cr was observed in weeping willows than hankow willows for the Cr (III) treated (p < 0.01). However, a convincing decrease in the translocation efficiency due to the removal of leaves was only observed in the treatments spiked with Cr (VI) (p < 0.05). Substantial differences existed in the distribution of Cr species in plant materials after exposure of either of the chemical forms: roots and lower stems were the major sites for accumulation in weeping willows exposed to Cr (VI) and Cr (III), respectively; in contrast roots were the only sink in hankow willows exposed to both chemical species. The capacity of willows to assimilate both Cr species was also evaluated using detached leaves and roots of both willow species in sealed glass vessels in vivo. The results indicated that detached roots showed a more remarkable capacity to remove Cr (III) from the hydroponic solution than Cr (VI) (p < 0.01). Although detached leaves of both willow species were able to efficiently eliminate Cr (III), neither of them reduced the concentration of Cr (VI) in the solution. The results suggests that different mechanisms for uptake, assimilation and translocation of Cr (VI) and Cr (III) exist in different willow species and phytoremediation of Cr should consider this factor for the proposed target effectively. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0963-9292en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEcotoxicologyen_HK
dc.subjectBioremediationen_HK
dc.subjectChromiumen_HK
dc.subjectHexavalent chromiumen_HK
dc.subjectTranslocationen_HK
dc.subjectTrivalent chromiumen_HK
dc.subjectUptakeen_HK
dc.subjectWillowsen_HK
dc.titleDifferences in uptake and translocation of hexavalent and trivalent chromium by two species of willowsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0963-9292&volume=17&spage=747&epage=755&date=2008&atitle=Differences+in+uptake+and+translocation+of+hexavalent+and+trivalent+chromium+by+two+species+of+willowsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10646-008-0224-yen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18470609-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-53249149618en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros160881en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-53249149618&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage747en_HK
dc.identifier.epage755en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000260157800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, XZ=24449490500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXing, LQ=35789459200en_HK

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