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Article: Uptake, accumulation and metabolic response of ferricyanide in weeping willows

TitleUptake, accumulation and metabolic response of ferricyanide in weeping willows
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherRoyal Society of Chemistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.rsc.org/jem
Citation
Journal Of Environmental Monitoring, 2009, v. 11 n. 1, p. 145-152 How to Cite?
AbstractThe remediation potential and metabolic responses of plants to ferricyanide were investigated using pre-rooted weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) grown hydroponically in growth chambers and treated with potassium ferricyanide. Positive responses were observed for the plants exposed to ≤ 274.13 mg CN L-1 as ferricyanide, exhibiting higher chlorophylls and soluble proteins compared with the controls. Visible toxic symptoms were only noted for the treatment exposed to 506.67 mg CN L-1 after 120 h of incubation. Activity of superoxide dismutases (SOD) in leaves showed a slight change to ferricyanide exposure in most treatments. Catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activities were negatively correlated to the concentrations of ferricyanide. Of all the selected parameters measured, soluble proteins of plants were the most sensitive to ferricyanide, showing a significant linear correlation (R 2 = 0.952). Between 6.90 and 12.66% of the applied ferricyanide were removed by plants from the hydroponic solution at different treatments over the 192 h of exposure. Small amounts of the applied chemical taken up from the hydroponic solutions were detected in all parts of plant materials: the highest concentration was associated with roots in all treatments, followed by stems; the lowest was observed in leaves. The mass balance analysis showed that the total cyanide recovered in plant biomass was constant in all treatments, indicating that transport is a major limiting step for the uptake of ferricyanide by plants. The majority of the ferricyanide taken up from the growth media was possibly assimilated during transport through plants. The velocity of the removal processes can be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and the half-saturation constant (KM) and the maximum removal capacity (vmax) were estimated to be 228.1 mg CN L-1 and 36.43 mg CN kg-1 d-1, respectively, using non-linear regression methods. These results suggest that weeping willows can take up, transport and assimilate ferricyanide; and phytoremediation is an option for cleaning up the environmental sites contaminated with cyanide complexes. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60648
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.179
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This work was supported by a Ph.D. studentship from The University of Hong Kong. Thanks to Sheng-Zhuo Huang, Luan Li and Shuo Liu for their technical assistance.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, XZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:15:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:15:48Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Environmental Monitoring, 2009, v. 11 n. 1, p. 145-152en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1464-0325en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60648-
dc.description.abstractThe remediation potential and metabolic responses of plants to ferricyanide were investigated using pre-rooted weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) grown hydroponically in growth chambers and treated with potassium ferricyanide. Positive responses were observed for the plants exposed to ≤ 274.13 mg CN L-1 as ferricyanide, exhibiting higher chlorophylls and soluble proteins compared with the controls. Visible toxic symptoms were only noted for the treatment exposed to 506.67 mg CN L-1 after 120 h of incubation. Activity of superoxide dismutases (SOD) in leaves showed a slight change to ferricyanide exposure in most treatments. Catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activities were negatively correlated to the concentrations of ferricyanide. Of all the selected parameters measured, soluble proteins of plants were the most sensitive to ferricyanide, showing a significant linear correlation (R 2 = 0.952). Between 6.90 and 12.66% of the applied ferricyanide were removed by plants from the hydroponic solution at different treatments over the 192 h of exposure. Small amounts of the applied chemical taken up from the hydroponic solutions were detected in all parts of plant materials: the highest concentration was associated with roots in all treatments, followed by stems; the lowest was observed in leaves. The mass balance analysis showed that the total cyanide recovered in plant biomass was constant in all treatments, indicating that transport is a major limiting step for the uptake of ferricyanide by plants. The majority of the ferricyanide taken up from the growth media was possibly assimilated during transport through plants. The velocity of the removal processes can be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and the half-saturation constant (KM) and the maximum removal capacity (vmax) were estimated to be 228.1 mg CN L-1 and 36.43 mg CN kg-1 d-1, respectively, using non-linear regression methods. These results suggest that weeping willows can take up, transport and assimilate ferricyanide; and phytoremediation is an option for cleaning up the environmental sites contaminated with cyanide complexes. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.rsc.org/jemen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Environmental Monitoringen_HK
dc.titleUptake, accumulation and metabolic response of ferricyanide in weeping willowsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1464-0325&volume=11&spage=145&epage=152&date=2009&atitle=Uptake,+accumulation+and+metabolic+response+of+ferricyanide+in+weeping+willowsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/b809304ken_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19137150-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58149381887en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros160887en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58149381887&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage145en_HK
dc.identifier.epage152en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262372000017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, XZ=24449490500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_HK

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