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Article: Occupational stress, mental health status and stress management behaviors among secondary school teachers in Hong Kong

TitleOccupational stress, mental health status and stress management behaviors among secondary school teachers in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsHong Kong
Mental health
Occupational stress
Secondary school
Stress management
Teachers
Issue Date2009
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=107639
Citation
Health Education Journal, 2009, v. 68 n. 4, p. 328-343 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective This study aimed to examine occupational stress and mental health among secondary school teachers in Hong Kong, and to identify the differences between those actively engaged in stress management behaviors and those who were not. Design Survey design was adopted using validated instruments including Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI-R), Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21), and Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLP) II. Setting The sample was 89 secondary school teachers who attended a professional development course offered by the University of Hong Kong in Hong Kong, People's Republic of China. Method All 99 students who attended the professional development course were invited and 89 consented to participate and returned the completed questionnaires. Results The majority of participants (75.3 percent) reported fair to very low satisfaction with the teaching career, and 82 percent of them felt unaccountably tired or exhausted. Results of OSI-R showed that 38.6 percent had experienced strong maladaptive stress due to vocational strain but coping resource was limited with most deficits on rational and cognitive coping. Analysis of DASS-21 indicated that 30.3 percent had severe to extremely severe anxiety and 12.3 percent had severe to extremely severe depression. HPLP II revealed that participants paid little attention to their own health and the management of stress. Those who exhibited more stress management behaviors showed significantly less physical symptoms, higher satisfaction with teaching, and lower occupational stress. Conclusion Secondary teachers in Hong Kong have high occupational stress but insufficient stress coping resources. Cognitive-behavioral programs to enhance teachers' stress management resources are recommended. © 2009 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60548
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.683
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.330
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWah Mak, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu Chui, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiang, VCLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, ACKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:13:22Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:13:22Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHealth Education Journal, 2009, v. 68 n. 4, p. 328-343en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0017-8969en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60548-
dc.description.abstractObjective This study aimed to examine occupational stress and mental health among secondary school teachers in Hong Kong, and to identify the differences between those actively engaged in stress management behaviors and those who were not. Design Survey design was adopted using validated instruments including Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI-R), Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21), and Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLP) II. Setting The sample was 89 secondary school teachers who attended a professional development course offered by the University of Hong Kong in Hong Kong, People's Republic of China. Method All 99 students who attended the professional development course were invited and 89 consented to participate and returned the completed questionnaires. Results The majority of participants (75.3 percent) reported fair to very low satisfaction with the teaching career, and 82 percent of them felt unaccountably tired or exhausted. Results of OSI-R showed that 38.6 percent had experienced strong maladaptive stress due to vocational strain but coping resource was limited with most deficits on rational and cognitive coping. Analysis of DASS-21 indicated that 30.3 percent had severe to extremely severe anxiety and 12.3 percent had severe to extremely severe depression. HPLP II revealed that participants paid little attention to their own health and the management of stress. Those who exhibited more stress management behaviors showed significantly less physical symptoms, higher satisfaction with teaching, and lower occupational stress. Conclusion Secondary teachers in Hong Kong have high occupational stress but insufficient stress coping resources. Cognitive-behavioral programs to enhance teachers' stress management resources are recommended. © 2009 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=107639en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Education Journalen_HK
dc.rightsHealth Education Journal. Copyright © Sage Publications Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectMental healthen_HK
dc.subjectOccupational stressen_HK
dc.subjectSecondary schoolen_HK
dc.subjectStress managementen_HK
dc.subjectTeachersen_HK
dc.titleOccupational stress, mental health status and stress management behaviors among secondary school teachers in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0017-8969&volume=&spage=&epage=&date=2008&atitle=Occupational+stress,+mental+health+status+and+stress+management+behaviors+among+secondary+school+teachers+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, SSK: sleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWah Mak, Y: makyw@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChiang, VCL: vchiang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, ACK: acklee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, SSK=rp00493en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWah Mak, Y=rp00525en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChiang, VCL=rp00520en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, ACK=rp00463en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0017896909349255en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77949596844en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros147958en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174417-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77949596844&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume68en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage328en_HK
dc.identifier.epage343en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274253600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, SSK=7202044879en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWah Mak, Y=36970189900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu Chui, Y=35754020700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiang, VCL=25632099300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, ACK=21834051800en_HK

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