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Article: Obesity: Attitudes of undergraduate student nurses and registered nurses

TitleObesity: Attitudes of undergraduate student nurses and registered nurses
Authors
KeywordsAttitudes
Nurses
Nursing
Obesity
Student nurses
Issue Date2009
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Nursing, 2009, v. 18 n. 16, p. 2355-2365 How to Cite?
AbstractAim. To investigate undergraduate student nurses' and registered nurses' attitudes towards obese persons and towards the management of obese patients. Background. Obesity is a global public health problem. Escalating rates of overweight and obesity are also taking a toll in Asian countries that have historically had much lower rates. Despite the growing prevalence of obesity worldwide, studies show that nurses and other health professionals hold negative attitudes towards obese people, which may affect the care of obese patients. Design. Cross-sectional study. Methods. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 352 undergraduate student nurses and 198 registered nurses. The questionnaire consisted of the Fat Phobia Scale, the Attitudes Toward Obese Adult Patients Scale and a demographic profile. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and student's t-tests. Results. Overall mean scores on the Fat Phobia Scale (3·53 SD 0·47) indicated average levels of fat phobia and mean scores on the Attitudes Toward Obese Adult Patients scale (2·64 SD 0·51) indicated neutral attitudes towards obese patients. Registered nurses had significantly higher levels of fat phobia and more negative attitudes than did student nurses. The majority of participants perceived that obese people liked food, overate and were shapeless, slow and unattractive. Additionally, over one-half of participants believed that obese adults should be put on a diet while in hospital. Conclusions. Results of this study show that both registered nurses and student nurses have negative perceptions of obesity and are unlikely to attribute positive characteristics to obese individuals. That registered nurses hold more negative attitudes towards obese person is cause for concern. Relevance to clinical practice. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity and the disproportionate number of obese persons affected by many health conditions, current and future nurses should have positive professional attitudes towards obese individuals. Obesity needs to more be adequately addressed, both in basic nursing education programs and in continuing professional education for practising nurses. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60531
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.384
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.755
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPoon, MYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:13:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:13:03Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Nursing, 2009, v. 18 n. 16, p. 2355-2365en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60531-
dc.description.abstractAim. To investigate undergraduate student nurses' and registered nurses' attitudes towards obese persons and towards the management of obese patients. Background. Obesity is a global public health problem. Escalating rates of overweight and obesity are also taking a toll in Asian countries that have historically had much lower rates. Despite the growing prevalence of obesity worldwide, studies show that nurses and other health professionals hold negative attitudes towards obese people, which may affect the care of obese patients. Design. Cross-sectional study. Methods. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 352 undergraduate student nurses and 198 registered nurses. The questionnaire consisted of the Fat Phobia Scale, the Attitudes Toward Obese Adult Patients Scale and a demographic profile. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and student's t-tests. Results. Overall mean scores on the Fat Phobia Scale (3·53 SD 0·47) indicated average levels of fat phobia and mean scores on the Attitudes Toward Obese Adult Patients scale (2·64 SD 0·51) indicated neutral attitudes towards obese patients. Registered nurses had significantly higher levels of fat phobia and more negative attitudes than did student nurses. The majority of participants perceived that obese people liked food, overate and were shapeless, slow and unattractive. Additionally, over one-half of participants believed that obese adults should be put on a diet while in hospital. Conclusions. Results of this study show that both registered nurses and student nurses have negative perceptions of obesity and are unlikely to attribute positive characteristics to obese individuals. That registered nurses hold more negative attitudes towards obese person is cause for concern. Relevance to clinical practice. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity and the disproportionate number of obese persons affected by many health conditions, current and future nurses should have positive professional attitudes towards obese individuals. Obesity needs to more be adequately addressed, both in basic nursing education programs and in continuing professional education for practising nurses. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Nursingen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Nursing. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectAttitudesen_HK
dc.subjectNursesen_HK
dc.subjectNursingen_HK
dc.subjectObesityen_HK
dc.subjectStudent nursesen_HK
dc.titleObesity: Attitudes of undergraduate student nurses and registered nursesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0962-1067&volume=18&spage=2355&epage=2365&date=2009&atitle=Obesity:+attitudes+of+undergraduate+student+nurses+and+registered+nursesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTarrant, M: tarrantm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTarrant, M=rp00461en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02709.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19374692-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68149094265en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros152666en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-68149094265&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue16en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2355en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2365en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267753400013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, MY=7103089890en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTarrant, M=7004340118en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5116690-

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