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Article: Changes in breast cancer patients after psychosocial intervention as indicated in drawings

TitleChanges in breast cancer patients after psychosocial intervention as indicated in drawings
Authors
KeywordsArt and drawings
Chinese cancer patients
Image analysis
Oncology
Psychosocial intervention
Issue Date2010
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2010, v. 19 n. 4, p. 353-360 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The present study attempts to understand the experience of breast cancer patients who had participated in an Eastern-based body-mind-spirit (BMS) psychosocial intervention program by observing changes in the images made by the patients. Methods: Pre- and post-intervention drawings on the theme of 'my cancer' were collected from 67 primary breast cancer patients. Two creative art therapists compared the drawings according to the structural and formal art elements (body), the symbols used (mind), and the emotions and feelings presented in the drawings (spirit). Numbers of pre- and post-intervention drawings, showing the presence of each element in these three dimensions, were also counted and compared. Results: There were several changes noted between pre- and post-intervention drawings. The use of color, space, and multiplicity increased from 12 to 17 %. Images of breasts decreased from 13 to 0%. Representations of cancer decreased from 15 to 7%. There was a slight increase in symbolic representations of natural, landscapes, and social support in post-drawings (3-6%). The portrayal of negative emotions was greatly reduced from 52 to 3%, while positive emotions increased from 28 to 93% in post-drawings. Conclusions: The comparison of pre- and post-intervention drawings revealed changes in subject matter and accompanying emotions. Overall, there was a trend in changes toward a more peaceful and hopeful attitude. Through the use of realistic and symbolic images, participants depicted a range of emotions. Limitations and recommendations for using art-making, as an assessment tool and intervention, are addressed. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60524
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Cancer Fund
Hong Kong Research Grants Council (RGC)HKU7212/03 H
Funding Information:

The authors thank all the participants and staff who were involved in this study. This study was supported by the Hong Kong Cancer Fund and the CERG Grant of the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (RGC) (HKU7212/03 H).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPotash, JSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFu, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KPLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:12:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:12:48Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2010, v. 19 n. 4, p. 353-360en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60524-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The present study attempts to understand the experience of breast cancer patients who had participated in an Eastern-based body-mind-spirit (BMS) psychosocial intervention program by observing changes in the images made by the patients. Methods: Pre- and post-intervention drawings on the theme of 'my cancer' were collected from 67 primary breast cancer patients. Two creative art therapists compared the drawings according to the structural and formal art elements (body), the symbols used (mind), and the emotions and feelings presented in the drawings (spirit). Numbers of pre- and post-intervention drawings, showing the presence of each element in these three dimensions, were also counted and compared. Results: There were several changes noted between pre- and post-intervention drawings. The use of color, space, and multiplicity increased from 12 to 17 %. Images of breasts decreased from 13 to 0%. Representations of cancer decreased from 15 to 7%. There was a slight increase in symbolic representations of natural, landscapes, and social support in post-drawings (3-6%). The portrayal of negative emotions was greatly reduced from 52 to 3%, while positive emotions increased from 28 to 93% in post-drawings. Conclusions: The comparison of pre- and post-intervention drawings revealed changes in subject matter and accompanying emotions. Overall, there was a trend in changes toward a more peaceful and hopeful attitude. Through the use of realistic and symbolic images, participants depicted a range of emotions. Limitations and recommendations for using art-making, as an assessment tool and intervention, are addressed. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_HK
dc.rightsThis is a preprint of an article published in Psycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectArt and drawingsen_HK
dc.subjectChinese cancer patientsen_HK
dc.subjectImage analysisen_HK
dc.subjectOncologyen_HK
dc.subjectPsychosocial interventionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshArt-
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms - psychology-
dc.subject.meshMind-Body Therapies - psychology-
dc.titleChanges in breast cancer patients after psychosocial intervention as indicated in drawingsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1057-9249&volume=19&issue=4&spage=353&epage=360&date=2010&atitle=Changes+in+breast+cancer+patients+after+psychosocial+intervention+as+indicated+in+drawingsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.1551en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19358159-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77950893058en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros170995en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77950893058&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage353en_HK
dc.identifier.epage360en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1611-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276801200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, RTH=8620896500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPotash, JS=30567698300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFu, W=15753344800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KPL=37125734900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=35274549700en_HK

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