File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The theory of reinvestment

TitleThe theory of reinvestment
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rirs20/1/2
Citation
International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2008, v. 1 n. 2, p. 160-183 How to Cite?
AbstractThis review provides an overview of a diverse, temporally distributed, body of literature regarding the effects of conscious attention to movement. An attempt is made to unite the many different views within the literature through Reinvestment Theory (Masters, 1992; Masters, Polman, & Hammond, 1993), which suggests that relatively automated motor processes can be disrupted if they are run using consciously accessed, task-relevant declarative knowledge to control the mechanics of the movements on-line. Reinvestment Theory argues that the propensity for consciousness to control movements on-line is a function of individual personality differences, specific contexts and a broad range of contingent events that can be psychological, physiological, environmental or even mechanical.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60494
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.682
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.962

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, JPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:12:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:12:02Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2008, v. 1 n. 2, p. 160-183en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1750-984Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60494-
dc.description.abstractThis review provides an overview of a diverse, temporally distributed, body of literature regarding the effects of conscious attention to movement. An attempt is made to unite the many different views within the literature through Reinvestment Theory (Masters, 1992; Masters, Polman, & Hammond, 1993), which suggests that relatively automated motor processes can be disrupted if they are run using consciously accessed, task-relevant declarative knowledge to control the mechanics of the movements on-line. Reinvestment Theory argues that the propensity for consciousness to control movements on-line is a function of individual personality differences, specific contexts and a broad range of contingent events that can be psychological, physiological, environmental or even mechanical.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rirs20/1/2en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Review of Sport and Exercise Psychologyen_HK
dc.titleThe theory of reinvestmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1750-984X&volume=1&spage=160&epage=183&date=2008&atitle=The+theory+of+reinvestmenten_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMaxwell, JP: maxwellj@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17509840802287218-
dc.identifier.hkuros152112en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats