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Article: Analogy learning and the performance of motor skills under pressure
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TitleAnalogy learning and the performance of motor skills under pressure
 
AuthorsLam, WK2
Maxwell, JP1
Masters, R1
 
KeywordsAnxiety
Attention
Basketball
Explicit
Implicit
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherHuman Kinetics
 
CitationJournal Of Sport And Exercise Psychology, 2009, v. 31 n. 3, p. 337-357 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractThe efficacy of analogical instruction, relative to explicit instruction, for the acquisition of a complex motor skill and subsequent performance under pressure was investigated using a modified (seated) basketball shooting task. Differences in attentional resource allocation associated with analogy and explicit learning were also examined using probe reaction times (PRT). Access to task-relevant explicit (declarative) knowledge was assessed. The analogy and explicit learning groups performed equally well during learning and delayed retention tests. The explicit group experienced a drop in performance during a pressured transfer test, relative to their performance during a preceding retention test. However, the analogy group's performance was unaffected by the pressure manipulation. Results from PRTs suggested that both groups allocated equal amounts of attentional resources to the task throughout learning and test trials. Analogy learners had significantly less access to rules about the mechanics of their movements, relative to explicit learners. The results are interpreted in the context of Eysenck and Calvo's (1992) processing efficiency theory and Masters's (1992) theory of reinvestment. © 2009 Human Kinetics, Inc.
 
ISSN0895-2779
2012 Impact Factor: 2.452
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.188
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000267444700003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, JP
 
dc.contributor.authorMasters, R
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:11:59Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:11:59Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractThe efficacy of analogical instruction, relative to explicit instruction, for the acquisition of a complex motor skill and subsequent performance under pressure was investigated using a modified (seated) basketball shooting task. Differences in attentional resource allocation associated with analogy and explicit learning were also examined using probe reaction times (PRT). Access to task-relevant explicit (declarative) knowledge was assessed. The analogy and explicit learning groups performed equally well during learning and delayed retention tests. The explicit group experienced a drop in performance during a pressured transfer test, relative to their performance during a preceding retention test. However, the analogy group's performance was unaffected by the pressure manipulation. Results from PRTs suggested that both groups allocated equal amounts of attentional resources to the task throughout learning and test trials. Analogy learners had significantly less access to rules about the mechanics of their movements, relative to explicit learners. The results are interpreted in the context of Eysenck and Calvo's (1992) processing efficiency theory and Masters's (1992) theory of reinvestment. © 2009 Human Kinetics, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Sport And Exercise Psychology, 2009, v. 31 n. 3, p. 337-357 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage357
 
dc.identifier.hkuros159964
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267444700003
 
dc.identifier.issn0895-2779
2012 Impact Factor: 2.452
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.188
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19798997
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68749120040
 
dc.identifier.spage337
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60491
 
dc.identifier.volume31
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectAnxiety
 
dc.subjectAttention
 
dc.subjectBasketball
 
dc.subjectExplicit
 
dc.subjectImplicit
 
dc.titleAnalogy learning and the performance of motor skills under pressure
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>The efficacy of analogical instruction, relative to explicit instruction, for the acquisition of a complex motor skill and subsequent performance under pressure was investigated using a modified (seated) basketball shooting task. Differences in attentional resource allocation associated with analogy and explicit learning were also examined using probe reaction times (PRT). Access to task-relevant explicit (declarative) knowledge was assessed. The analogy and explicit learning groups performed equally well during learning and delayed retention tests. The explicit group experienced a drop in performance during a pressured transfer test, relative to their performance during a preceding retention test. However, the analogy group&apos;s performance was unaffected by the pressure manipulation. Results from PRTs suggested that both groups allocated equal amounts of attentional resources to the task throughout learning and test trials. Analogy learners had significantly less access to rules about the mechanics of their movements, relative to explicit learners. The results are interpreted in the context of Eysenck and Calvo&apos;s (1992) processing efficiency theory and Masters&apos;s (1992) theory of reinvestment. &#169; 2009 Human Kinetics, Inc.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hong Kong Polytechnic University