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Article: Reinvestment and movement disruption following stroke

TitleReinvestment and movement disruption following stroke
Authors
KeywordsMovement disruption
Rehabilitation
Reinvestment
Stroke
Issue Date2009
PublisherSage Science Press (US). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=336
Citation
Neurorehabilitation And Neural Repair, 2009, v. 23 n. 2, p. 177-183 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Disruption of the automaticity of movement execution is commonly experienced by people with stroke and may result from the person consciously attempting to control the mechanics of his or her movements. This act of turning one's attention in toward the mechanics of an action is referred to as "reinvestment." Objectives. This study aimed to explore the hypothesis that people with stroke have a greater propensity for reinvestment than the nondisabled population and to examine the relationship between reinvestment, functional impairment from stroke, and aspects of rehabilitation. Methods. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was used. A total of 148 people with stroke and 148 nondisabled adults completed the Movement Specific Reinvestment Scale. Correlational and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between functional impairment and various potential predictors. Results. Compared with controls, people with stroke had a greater propensity for reinvestment. Conscious motor processing and time spent in rehabilitation were significant predictors of functional impairment following stroke. Conclusions. The association between functional impairment, propensity for reinvestment, and time spent in rehabilitation indicates that exclusive reliance on conscious motor processing strategies in the rehabilitation setting may be an impediment to regaining functional independence. There is a need to develop motor learning strategies for rehabilitation that restrain the propensity for reinvestment. © 2009 The American Society of Neurorehabilitation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60480
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.035
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.514
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOrrell, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEves, FFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:11:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:11:46Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeurorehabilitation And Neural Repair, 2009, v. 23 n. 2, p. 177-183en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1545-9683en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60480-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Disruption of the automaticity of movement execution is commonly experienced by people with stroke and may result from the person consciously attempting to control the mechanics of his or her movements. This act of turning one's attention in toward the mechanics of an action is referred to as "reinvestment." Objectives. This study aimed to explore the hypothesis that people with stroke have a greater propensity for reinvestment than the nondisabled population and to examine the relationship between reinvestment, functional impairment from stroke, and aspects of rehabilitation. Methods. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was used. A total of 148 people with stroke and 148 nondisabled adults completed the Movement Specific Reinvestment Scale. Correlational and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between functional impairment and various potential predictors. Results. Compared with controls, people with stroke had a greater propensity for reinvestment. Conscious motor processing and time spent in rehabilitation were significant predictors of functional impairment following stroke. Conclusions. The association between functional impairment, propensity for reinvestment, and time spent in rehabilitation indicates that exclusive reliance on conscious motor processing strategies in the rehabilitation setting may be an impediment to regaining functional independence. There is a need to develop motor learning strategies for rehabilitation that restrain the propensity for reinvestment. © 2009 The American Society of Neurorehabilitation.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Science Press (US). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=336en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeurorehabilitation and Neural Repairen_HK
dc.subjectMovement disruptionen_HK
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_HK
dc.subjectReinvestmenten_HK
dc.subjectStrokeen_HK
dc.titleReinvestment and movement disruption following strokeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1545-9683&volume=23&spage=177&epage=183&date=2009&atitle=Reinvestment+and+movement+disruption+following+strokeen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1545968308317752en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18987385-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58849131518en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154939en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58849131518&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage177en_HK
dc.identifier.epage183en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262949900010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOrrell, AJ=12778780000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEves, FF=6701797804en_HK

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