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Article: Gender, level of participation, and type of sport: Differences in achievement goal orientation and attributional style

TitleGender, level of participation, and type of sport: Differences in achievement goal orientation and attributional style
Authors
KeywordsAchievement goal orientations
Attributions
Gender
Motivation
Issue Date2009
PublisherElsevier Australia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/707423/description?navopenmenu=-2
Citation
Journal Of Science And Medicine In Sport, 2009, v. 12 n. 4, p. 508-512 How to Cite?
AbstractFindings regarding gender differences in achievement goal orientations and attributional style have been somewhat inconsistent. One possible explanation for varied findings is that potentially confounding variables such as level of participation and type of sport have not been considered. Athletes (108 males and 164 females) from team and individual sports, competing at recreational and competitive levels, completed the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire, the Sport Attributional Style Scale, and a demographic questionnaire. Athletes competing in individual sports had a higher ego orientation than those from team sports, and females scored higher in task orientation than males. Individual sport athletes made more internal, stable, and global, and less externally controllable attributions for positive events, and more internal attributions for negative events than team sport athletes. Competitive female athletes made less global attributions for positive events than did recreational female athletes. This difference was not observed in male athletes. Competitive individual, but not team, athletes made less global attributions than recreational individual athletes. The significant interactions regarding globality suggest that the tradition in sport psychology attribution research to focus solely on internality, stability, and controllability may be inadequate. From an applied perspective, sport psychologists and coaches may find it beneficial to target individual sport athletes and males for interventions designed to enhance task orientation. Similarly, team sport athletes may be appropriate as a focus for attribution retraining programs. Crown Copyright © 2008.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60473
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.756
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.484
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
ARC SPIRTC10027010
Funding Information:

This research was funded by ARC SPIRT grant #C10027010.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHanrahan, SJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:11:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:11:39Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Science And Medicine In Sport, 2009, v. 12 n. 4, p. 508-512en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1440-2440en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60473-
dc.description.abstractFindings regarding gender differences in achievement goal orientations and attributional style have been somewhat inconsistent. One possible explanation for varied findings is that potentially confounding variables such as level of participation and type of sport have not been considered. Athletes (108 males and 164 females) from team and individual sports, competing at recreational and competitive levels, completed the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire, the Sport Attributional Style Scale, and a demographic questionnaire. Athletes competing in individual sports had a higher ego orientation than those from team sports, and females scored higher in task orientation than males. Individual sport athletes made more internal, stable, and global, and less externally controllable attributions for positive events, and more internal attributions for negative events than team sport athletes. Competitive female athletes made less global attributions for positive events than did recreational female athletes. This difference was not observed in male athletes. Competitive individual, but not team, athletes made less global attributions than recreational individual athletes. The significant interactions regarding globality suggest that the tradition in sport psychology attribution research to focus solely on internality, stability, and controllability may be inadequate. From an applied perspective, sport psychologists and coaches may find it beneficial to target individual sport athletes and males for interventions designed to enhance task orientation. Similarly, team sport athletes may be appropriate as a focus for attribution retraining programs. Crown Copyright © 2008.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Australia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/707423/description?navopenmenu=-2en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Science and Medicine in Sporten_HK
dc.subjectAchievement goal orientationsen_HK
dc.subjectAttributionsen_HK
dc.subjectGenderen_HK
dc.subjectMotivationen_HK
dc.titleGender, level of participation, and type of sport: Differences in achievement goal orientation and attributional styleen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1440-2440&volume=12&spage=508&epage=518&date=2009&atitle=Gender,+Level+of+participation,+and+type+of+sport:+Differences+in+achievement+goal+orientation+and+attributional+styleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsams.2008.01.005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18356105-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67349249192en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros165030en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67349249192&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage508en_HK
dc.identifier.epage512en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000268542400019-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHanrahan, SJ=7003347968en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK

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