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Article: The international prevalence study on physical activity: Results from 20 countries
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TitleThe international prevalence study on physical activity: Results from 20 countries
 
AuthorsBauman, A29
Bull, F13 18
Chey, T29
Craig, CL12
Ainsworth, BE29
Sallis, JF6
Bowles, HR29
Hagstromer, M15
Sjostrom, M15
Pratt, M25
Díaz, CG31
Bazan, N31
Kunic, H31
Bauman, A10
Merom, D10
Smith, B10
De Bourdeaudhuij, I9 32
Lefevre, J9 32
Philippaerts, R9 32
Matsudo, SM14
Matsudo, VR14
Craig, CL12
Cameron, C12
Yang, Li23
Hua, Fu23
Gómez, LF19
Fromel, K2
Mitas, J2
Macfarlane, D7
BaconShone, J7
Reddy, SK22
Joshi, P22
Goenka, S22
Prabhakaran, D22
Katsumura, T30
Murase, N30
Volbekiene, V3
Baubliene, R3
McLean, G17
Carr, H8
Tomten, H1
Anderssen, SA20
Sardinha, L21
Mota, J11
AlHazzaa, HM4
Serra Majem, L26
Roman, B26
Sjöström, M16
Hagströmer, M16
Bergman, P16
Yiing, ML27
YungTai, H5
Ainsworth, BE24
Hipp, D25
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijbnpa.org/
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Behavioral Nutrition And Physical Activity, 2009, v. 6 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-6-21
 
AbstractBackground: Physical activity (PA) is one of the most important factors for improving population health, but no standardised systems exist for international surveillance. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was developed for international surveillance. The purpose of this study was a comparative international study of population physical activity prevalence across 20 countries. Methods: Between 2002-2004, a standardised protocol using IPAQ was used to assess PA participation in 20 countries [total N = 52,746, aged 18-65 years]. The median survey response rate was 61%. Physical activity levels were categorised as "low", "moderate" and "high". Age-adjusted prevalence estimates are presented by sex. Results: The prevalence of "high PA" varied from 21-63%;in eight countries high PA was reported for over half of the adult population. The prevalence of "low PA" varied from 9% to 43%. Males more frequently reported high PA than females in 17 of 20 countries. The prevalence of low PA ranged from 7-41% among males, and 6-49% among females. Gender differences were noted, especially for younger adults, with males more active than females in most countries. Markedly lower physical activity prevalence (10% difference) with increasing age was noted in 11 of 19 countries for males, but only in three countries for women. The ways populations accumulated PA differed, with some reporting mostly vigorous intensity activities and others mostly walking. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of international PA surveillance, and showed that IPAQ is an acceptable surveillance instrument, at least within countries. If assessment methods are used consistently over time, trend data will inform countries about the success of their efforts to promote physical activity. © 2009 Bauman et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
 
ISSN1479-5868
2013 Impact Factor: 3.675
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.196
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-6-21
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000265840200002
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorBauman, A
 
dc.contributor.authorBull, F
 
dc.contributor.authorChey, T
 
dc.contributor.authorCraig, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorAinsworth, BE
 
dc.contributor.authorSallis, JF
 
dc.contributor.authorBowles, HR
 
dc.contributor.authorHagstromer, M
 
dc.contributor.authorSjostrom, M
 
dc.contributor.authorPratt, M
 
dc.contributor.authorDíaz, CG
 
dc.contributor.authorBazan, N
 
dc.contributor.authorKunic, H
 
dc.contributor.authorBauman, A
 
dc.contributor.authorMerom, D
 
dc.contributor.authorSmith, B
 
dc.contributor.authorDe Bourdeaudhuij, I
 
dc.contributor.authorLefevre, J
 
dc.contributor.authorPhilippaerts, R
 
dc.contributor.authorMatsudo, SM
 
dc.contributor.authorMatsudo, VR
 
dc.contributor.authorCraig, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorCameron, C
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, Li
 
dc.contributor.authorHua, Fu
 
dc.contributor.authorGómez, LF
 
dc.contributor.authorFromel, K
 
dc.contributor.authorMitas, J
 
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, D
 
dc.contributor.authorBaconShone, J
 
dc.contributor.authorReddy, SK
 
dc.contributor.authorJoshi, P
 
dc.contributor.authorGoenka, S
 
dc.contributor.authorPrabhakaran, D
 
dc.contributor.authorKatsumura, T
 
dc.contributor.authorMurase, N
 
dc.contributor.authorVolbekiene, V
 
dc.contributor.authorBaubliene, R
 
dc.contributor.authorMcLean, G
 
dc.contributor.authorCarr, H
 
dc.contributor.authorTomten, H
 
dc.contributor.authorAnderssen, SA
 
dc.contributor.authorSardinha, L
 
dc.contributor.authorMota, J
 
dc.contributor.authorAlHazzaa, HM
 
dc.contributor.authorSerra Majem, L
 
dc.contributor.authorRoman, B
 
dc.contributor.authorSjöström, M
 
dc.contributor.authorHagströmer, M
 
dc.contributor.authorBergman, P
 
dc.contributor.authorYiing, ML
 
dc.contributor.authorYungTai, H
 
dc.contributor.authorAinsworth, BE
 
dc.contributor.authorHipp, D
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:11:33Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:11:33Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Physical activity (PA) is one of the most important factors for improving population health, but no standardised systems exist for international surveillance. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was developed for international surveillance. The purpose of this study was a comparative international study of population physical activity prevalence across 20 countries. Methods: Between 2002-2004, a standardised protocol using IPAQ was used to assess PA participation in 20 countries [total N = 52,746, aged 18-65 years]. The median survey response rate was 61%. Physical activity levels were categorised as "low", "moderate" and "high". Age-adjusted prevalence estimates are presented by sex. Results: The prevalence of "high PA" varied from 21-63%;in eight countries high PA was reported for over half of the adult population. The prevalence of "low PA" varied from 9% to 43%. Males more frequently reported high PA than females in 17 of 20 countries. The prevalence of low PA ranged from 7-41% among males, and 6-49% among females. Gender differences were noted, especially for younger adults, with males more active than females in most countries. Markedly lower physical activity prevalence (10% difference) with increasing age was noted in 11 of 19 countries for males, but only in three countries for women. The ways populations accumulated PA differed, with some reporting mostly vigorous intensity activities and others mostly walking. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of international PA surveillance, and showed that IPAQ is an acceptable surveillance instrument, at least within countries. If assessment methods are used consistently over time, trend data will inform countries about the success of their efforts to promote physical activity. © 2009 Bauman et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Behavioral Nutrition And Physical Activity, 2009, v. 6 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-6-21
 
dc.identifier.citeulike4241059
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-6-21
 
dc.identifier.hkuros155259
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000265840200002
 
dc.identifier.issn1479-5868
2013 Impact Factor: 3.675
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.196
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65149085515
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60468
 
dc.identifier.volume6
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijbnpa.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleThe international prevalence study on physical activity: Results from 20 countries
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<date.accessioned>2010-05-31T04:11:33Z</date.accessioned>
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<description.abstract>Background: Physical activity (PA) is one of the most important factors for improving population health, but no standardised systems exist for international surveillance. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was developed for international surveillance. The purpose of this study was a comparative international study of population physical activity prevalence across 20 countries. Methods: Between 2002-2004, a standardised protocol using IPAQ was used to assess PA participation in 20 countries [total N = 52,746, aged 18-65 years]. The median survey response rate was 61%. Physical activity levels were categorised as &quot;low&quot;, &quot;moderate&quot; and &quot;high&quot;. Age-adjusted prevalence estimates are presented by sex. Results: The prevalence of &quot;high PA&quot; varied from 21-63%;in eight countries high PA was reported for over half of the adult population. The prevalence of &quot;low PA&quot; varied from 9% to 43%. Males more frequently reported high PA than females in 17 of 20 countries. The prevalence of low PA ranged from 7-41% among males, and 6-49% among females. Gender differences were noted, especially for younger adults, with males more active than females in most countries. Markedly lower physical activity prevalence (10% difference) with increasing age was noted in 11 of 19 countries for males, but only in three countries for women. The ways populations accumulated PA differed, with some reporting mostly vigorous intensity activities and others mostly walking. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of international PA surveillance, and showed that IPAQ is an acceptable surveillance instrument, at least within countries. If assessment methods are used consistently over time, trend data will inform countries about the success of their efforts to promote physical activity. &#169; 2009 Bauman et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. null
  2. Univerzita Palackého v Olomouci
  3. Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education
  4. King Saud University
  5. National Taiwan University
  6. San Diego State University
  7. The University of Hong Kong
  8. Ministry of Health - New Zealand
  9. Universiteit Gent
  10. University of Sydney
  11. Universidade do Porto
  12. Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute
  13. Loughborough University
  14. CELAFISCS - Physical Fitness Research Center (Celfasics)
  15. NOVUM
  16. Karolinska Institutet
  17. Sport and Recreation New Zealand
  18. University of Western Australia
  19. null
  20. Norges idrettshøgskole
  21. Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa
  22. All India Institute of Medical Sciences
  23. Fudan University
  24. Arizona State University
  25. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  26. Universitat de Barcelona
  27. National Yang-Ming University Taiwan
  28. null
  29. University of Sydney Faculty of Medicine
  30. Tokyo Medical University
  31. Medicina del Deporte SA
  32. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven