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Article: Effects of sad mood on facial emotion recognition in Chinese people

TitleEffects of sad mood on facial emotion recognition in Chinese people
Authors
KeywordsDepressed mood
Facial emotion
Facial expressions
Mood
Sadness
Issue Date2008
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychres
Citation
Psychiatry Research, 2008, v. 159 n. 1-2, p. 37-43 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examined the influence of sad mood on the judgment of ambiguous facial emotion expressions among 47 healthy volunteers who had been induced to feel sad (n = 13), neutral (n = 15), or happy (n = 19) emotions by watching video clips. The findings suggest that when the targets were ambiguous, participants who were in a sad mood tended to classify them in the negative emotional categories rather than the positive emotional categories. Also, this observation indicates that emotion-specific negative bias in the judgment of facial expressions is associated with a sad mood. The finding argues against a general impairment in decoding facial expressions. Furthermore, the observed mood-congruent negative bias was best predicted by spatial perception. The findings of this study provide insights into the cognitive processes underlying the interpersonal difficulties experienced by people in a sad mood, which may be predisposing factors in the development of clinical depression. © 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60385
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.466
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.235
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, EHHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, SWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CCHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:09:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:09:35Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychiatry Research, 2008, v. 159 n. 1-2, p. 37-43en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0165-1781en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60385-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the influence of sad mood on the judgment of ambiguous facial emotion expressions among 47 healthy volunteers who had been induced to feel sad (n = 13), neutral (n = 15), or happy (n = 19) emotions by watching video clips. The findings suggest that when the targets were ambiguous, participants who were in a sad mood tended to classify them in the negative emotional categories rather than the positive emotional categories. Also, this observation indicates that emotion-specific negative bias in the judgment of facial expressions is associated with a sad mood. The finding argues against a general impairment in decoding facial expressions. Furthermore, the observed mood-congruent negative bias was best predicted by spatial perception. The findings of this study provide insights into the cognitive processes underlying the interpersonal difficulties experienced by people in a sad mood, which may be predisposing factors in the development of clinical depression. © 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychiatry Researchen_HK
dc.rightsPsychiatry Research. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectDepressed mooden_HK
dc.subjectFacial emotionen_HK
dc.subjectFacial expressionsen_HK
dc.subjectMooden_HK
dc.subjectSadnessen_HK
dc.titleEffects of sad mood on facial emotion recognition in Chinese peopleen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0165-1781&volume=159&spage=37&epage=43&date=2008&atitle=Effects+of+sad+mood+on+facial+emotion+recognition+in+Chinese+peopleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC:tmclee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychres.2007.04.022en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18329723-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-42749090900en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros164976en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros141716-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-42749090900&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume159en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage37en_HK
dc.identifier.epage43en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256517700006-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMC=7501437381en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, EHH=23968475400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, SW=7403437221en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CCH=16244174500en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3045701-

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