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Article: Childhood growth and adulthood cognition in a rapidly developing population

TitleChildhood growth and adulthood cognition in a rapidly developing population
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
Citation
Epidemiology, 2009, v. 20 n. 1, p. 91-99 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Skeletal growth occurs concurrently with cognitive development. Better childhood conditions, proxied by greater adult height or leg length but not sitting height, have been positively associated with adult cognition mainly in white populations in developed countries. Whether skeletal growth is universally associated with cognitive function is unclear. We examined the association of height and its components with adulthood cognitive function in an area of southern China where there has been rapid economic development. METHODS: Multivariable logistic regression was used in a cross-sectional study of 20,411 Chinese men and women aged 50 years or older from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. We assessed the association of height and its components with a test of mild cognitive impairment in which impairment was defined as a score of 3 or less on the 10-word delayed recall test. RESULTS: Greater height and sitting height were associated with better recall in men (odds ratio = 1.15 [95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.32] per 10 cm greater height and 1.33 [1.04-1.69] per 10 cm greater sitting height) and women (1.21 [1.10-1.33] and 1.56 [1.33-1.83], respectively) adjusting for age, education, personal income, and for smoking in men and age of menarche in women. Greater leg length in both sexes was associated with a higher test score. CONCLUSIONS: Certain phases of childhood or adolescent growth may be cognitively protective. If confirmed, these results highlight the childhood and adolescence antecedents of adult disease, with corresponding public health implications for healthy aging. © 2009 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60306
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.075
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.981
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China
University of Bitmingham, Birmingham, UK
Funding Information:

Supported by The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong; The University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China; and The University of Bitmingham, Birmingham, UK.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHeys, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAdab, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:07:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:07:57Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology, 2009, v. 20 n. 1, p. 91-99en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60306-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Skeletal growth occurs concurrently with cognitive development. Better childhood conditions, proxied by greater adult height or leg length but not sitting height, have been positively associated with adult cognition mainly in white populations in developed countries. Whether skeletal growth is universally associated with cognitive function is unclear. We examined the association of height and its components with adulthood cognitive function in an area of southern China where there has been rapid economic development. METHODS: Multivariable logistic regression was used in a cross-sectional study of 20,411 Chinese men and women aged 50 years or older from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. We assessed the association of height and its components with a test of mild cognitive impairment in which impairment was defined as a score of 3 or less on the 10-word delayed recall test. RESULTS: Greater height and sitting height were associated with better recall in men (odds ratio = 1.15 [95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.32] per 10 cm greater height and 1.33 [1.04-1.69] per 10 cm greater sitting height) and women (1.21 [1.10-1.33] and 1.56 [1.33-1.83], respectively) adjusting for age, education, personal income, and for smoking in men and age of menarche in women. Greater leg length in both sexes was associated with a higher test score. CONCLUSIONS: Certain phases of childhood or adolescent growth may be cognitively protective. If confirmed, these results highlight the childhood and adolescence antecedents of adult disease, with corresponding public health implications for healthy aging. © 2009 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsEpidemiology. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Height - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBone Development - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild Development - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshChinaen_HK
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders - diagnosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.titleChildhood growth and adulthood cognition in a rapidly developing populationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1044-3983&volume=20&issue=1&spage=91&epage=99&date=2009&atitle=Childhood+growth+and+adulthood+cognition+in+a+rapidly+developing+populationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHeys, M: m_heys@lycos.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHeys, M=rp00257en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/EDE.0b013e3181880396en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19244658-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67651098901en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154650en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67651098901&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage91en_HK
dc.identifier.epage99en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000261930800017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeys, M=22234232400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, C=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAdab, P=6601949045en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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