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Article: Are longer legs associated with enhanced fertility in Chinese women?

TitleAre longer legs associated with enhanced fertility in Chinese women?
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Fertility
Leg length
Issue Date2008
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ens
Citation
Evolution And Human Behavior, 2008, v. 29 n. 6, p. 434-443 How to Cite?
AbstractFemale height impacts fertility differently in western and nonwestern cultures. Leg length or relatively longer legs comprise key components of height and possibly indicates mate value. We examined the associations between height, its components, and reproductive outcomes in a large Chinese cohort. Multivariable regression was used to assess the association of height, leg length (standing minus sitting height) and relatively longer legs with number of offspring in a cross-sectional sample of 9998 Chinese people aged at least 50 years from Phase 2 of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study recruited in 2005-2006. Older and less educated respondents had more children. Adjusted for age, childhood socioeconomic status (SES), and education, women with longer legs had more offspring; however, there was no such association in men. When stratified by childhood SES (reported parental material possessions), longer legs and relatively longer legs were most strongly associated with more offspring in women from poorer backgrounds. Fertility was specifically associated with longer legs and relatively longer legs in women only. The difference in the association of leg length to number of offspring by childhood SES suggests a preference advantage rather than a physiological advantage in being taller. However, these benefits were specific to reproductive success in women and particularly women from poorer backgrounds suggesting that social factors may have facilitated fertility. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60303
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.223
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.942
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAdab, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLao, XQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:07:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:07:54Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEvolution And Human Behavior, 2008, v. 29 n. 6, p. 434-443en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1090-5138en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60303-
dc.description.abstractFemale height impacts fertility differently in western and nonwestern cultures. Leg length or relatively longer legs comprise key components of height and possibly indicates mate value. We examined the associations between height, its components, and reproductive outcomes in a large Chinese cohort. Multivariable regression was used to assess the association of height, leg length (standing minus sitting height) and relatively longer legs with number of offspring in a cross-sectional sample of 9998 Chinese people aged at least 50 years from Phase 2 of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study recruited in 2005-2006. Older and less educated respondents had more children. Adjusted for age, childhood socioeconomic status (SES), and education, women with longer legs had more offspring; however, there was no such association in men. When stratified by childhood SES (reported parental material possessions), longer legs and relatively longer legs were most strongly associated with more offspring in women from poorer backgrounds. Fertility was specifically associated with longer legs and relatively longer legs in women only. The difference in the association of leg length to number of offspring by childhood SES suggests a preference advantage rather than a physiological advantage in being taller. However, these benefits were specific to reproductive success in women and particularly women from poorer backgrounds suggesting that social factors may have facilitated fertility. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ensen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEvolution and Human Behavioren_HK
dc.rightsEvolution and Human Behavior. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectFertilityen_HK
dc.subjectLeg lengthen_HK
dc.titleAre longer legs associated with enhanced fertility in Chinese women?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1090-5138&volume=29&spage=434&epage=443&date=2008&atitle=Are+longer+legs+associated+with+enhanced+fertility+in+Chinese+women?en_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2008.06.003en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-53749086422en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros153482en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-53749086422&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage434en_HK
dc.identifier.epage443en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000260617700008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAdab, P=6601949045en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, XQ=24512331300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5182913-

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