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Article: Evolutionary dynamics and emergence of panzootic H5N1 influenza viruses

TitleEvolutionary dynamics and emergence of panzootic H5N1 influenza viruses
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://pathogens.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=index-html&issn=1553-7374
Citation
Plos Pathogens, 2008, v. 4 n. 9 How to Cite?
AbstractThe highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus lineage has undergone extensive genetic reassortment with viruses from different sources to produce numerous H5N1 genotypes, and also developed into multiple genetically distinct sublineages in China. From there, the virus has spread to over 60 countries. The ecological success of this virus in diverse species of both poultry and wild birds with frequent introduction to humans suggests that it is a likely source of the next human pandemic. Therefore, the evolutionary and ecological characteristics of its emergence from wild birds into poultry are of considerable interest. Here, we apply the latest analytical techniques to infer the early evolutionary dynamics of H5N1 virus in the population from which it emerged (wild birds and domestic poultry). By estimating the time of most recent common ancestors of each gene segment, we show that the H5N1 prototype virus was likely introduced from wild birds into poultry as a non-reassortant low pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus and was not generated by reassortment in poultry. In contrast, more recent H5N1 genotypes were generated locally in aquatic poultry after the prototype virus (A/ goose/Guangdong/1/96) introduction occurred, i.e., they were not a result of additional emergence from wild birds. We show that the H5N1 virus was introduced into Indonesia and Vietnam 3-6 months prior to detection of the first outbreaks in those countries. Population dynamics analyses revealed a rapid increase in the genetic diversity of A/goose/Guangdong/ 1/96 lineage viruses from mid-1999 to early 2000. Our results suggest that the transmission of reassortant viruses through the mixed poultry population in farms and markets in China has selected HPAI H5N1 viruses that are well adapted to multiple hosts and reduced the interspecies transmission barrier of those viruses. © 2008 Vijaykrishna et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60296
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.003
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.185
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Li Ka Shing Foundation
National Institutes of Health (NIAID)HHSN266200700005C
Area of Excellence Scheme of the UniversityAoE/M-12/06
Hong Kong SAR GovernmentHKU 7512/06 M
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the Li Ka Shing Foundation, the National Institutes of Health (NIAID contract HHSN266200700005C), the Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee (Grant AoE/M-12/06) and Research Grants Council (HKU 7512/06 M) of the Hong Kong SAR Government. GJDS is supported by a career development award under NIAID contract HHSN266200700005C.

References
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVijaykrishna, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorBahl, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRiley, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDuan, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorJin, XZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GJDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:07:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:07:46Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos Pathogens, 2008, v. 4 n. 9en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1553-7366en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60296-
dc.description.abstractThe highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus lineage has undergone extensive genetic reassortment with viruses from different sources to produce numerous H5N1 genotypes, and also developed into multiple genetically distinct sublineages in China. From there, the virus has spread to over 60 countries. The ecological success of this virus in diverse species of both poultry and wild birds with frequent introduction to humans suggests that it is a likely source of the next human pandemic. Therefore, the evolutionary and ecological characteristics of its emergence from wild birds into poultry are of considerable interest. Here, we apply the latest analytical techniques to infer the early evolutionary dynamics of H5N1 virus in the population from which it emerged (wild birds and domestic poultry). By estimating the time of most recent common ancestors of each gene segment, we show that the H5N1 prototype virus was likely introduced from wild birds into poultry as a non-reassortant low pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus and was not generated by reassortment in poultry. In contrast, more recent H5N1 genotypes were generated locally in aquatic poultry after the prototype virus (A/ goose/Guangdong/1/96) introduction occurred, i.e., they were not a result of additional emergence from wild birds. We show that the H5N1 virus was introduced into Indonesia and Vietnam 3-6 months prior to detection of the first outbreaks in those countries. Population dynamics analyses revealed a rapid increase in the genetic diversity of A/goose/Guangdong/ 1/96 lineage viruses from mid-1999 to early 2000. Our results suggest that the transmission of reassortant viruses through the mixed poultry population in farms and markets in China has selected HPAI H5N1 viruses that are well adapted to multiple hosts and reduced the interspecies transmission barrier of those viruses. © 2008 Vijaykrishna et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://pathogens.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=index-html&issn=1553-7374en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Pathogensen_HK
dc.titleEvolutionary dynamics and emergence of panzootic H5N1 influenza virusesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailRiley, S: steven.riley@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailJin, XZ: zhangajx@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, H: hlchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSmith, GJD: gjsmith@hkucc1.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityRiley, S=rp00511en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJin, XZ=rp00413en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp00383en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySmith, GJD=rp00444en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.ppat.1000161en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-53049110309en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros157668en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-53049110309&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume4en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1553-7374-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000259783300018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVijaykrishna, D=12752817700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBahl, J=35308668200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRiley, S=7102619416en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDuan, L=7201932765en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, XZ=12752135600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, H=26643315400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, GJD=8344015800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8667841-

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