File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: DDT levels in human milk in Hong Kong, 2001-02

TitleDDT levels in human milk in Hong Kong, 2001-02
Authors
KeywordsBreast milk
DDD
DDE
DDT
Hong Kong
Issue Date2008
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphere
Citation
Chemosphere, 2008, v. 73 n. 1, p. 50-55 How to Cite?
AbstractHigh levels of p,p′-DDT were detected in Hong Kong breast milk sampled in 1976 and 1985. Monitoring DDT levels in human breast milk in this region is important to identify trends in exposure. As part of the 2002-03 WHO/EURO coordinated exposure study, the concentrations of DDT and its metabolites were determined in 10 pooled milk samples classified by geographic origin and dietary history, comprising milk samples from 238 primiparous mothers giving birth in Hong Kong. Analysis was performed by Gas Chromatography (GC) with electron capture detector and confirmed by GC/Mass Spectrometry. The sum-DDT concentration (range: 0.92-2.05 mg/kg fat) was age-dependent and indicated a decreasing trend since the 1970s. Mothers who recently came from mainland China had higher p,p′-DDT to p,p′-DDE ratios, suggesting a more recent exposure compared to women mainly residing in Hong Kong. The average Hong Kong sum-DDT level (1.50 mg/kg fat) was among the highest of the contemporary levels (range: 0.12-1.97 mg/kg fat; median: 0.40 mg/kg fat) in the 16 countries/regions participating in the 2002-03 WHO/EURO exposure study. This is probably due to the previous extensive DDT exposure and continuing use of DDT in agriculture in mainland China. Despite the apparent decrease of DDT body load over 30 years, the environmental health hazard from DDT contamination in the Pearl River Delta region remains a concern. Measures to eradicate illegal use of DDT in mainland China and regular food monitoring programs are needed in the region. Despite the presence of DDT and other persistent organic pollutants in human breast milk, breastfeeding should continue to be strongly supported for its life-long benefits to infants. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60293
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.698
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.536
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Environment Conservation Fund8/2000
Funding Information:

This work was Supported by the Hong Kong Environment Conservation Fund, Grant 8/2000.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, LLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKypke, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNelson, EASen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, TWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorvan Leeuwen, FXRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMalisch, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:07:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:07:43Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChemosphere, 2008, v. 73 n. 1, p. 50-55en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0045-6535en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60293-
dc.description.abstractHigh levels of p,p′-DDT were detected in Hong Kong breast milk sampled in 1976 and 1985. Monitoring DDT levels in human breast milk in this region is important to identify trends in exposure. As part of the 2002-03 WHO/EURO coordinated exposure study, the concentrations of DDT and its metabolites were determined in 10 pooled milk samples classified by geographic origin and dietary history, comprising milk samples from 238 primiparous mothers giving birth in Hong Kong. Analysis was performed by Gas Chromatography (GC) with electron capture detector and confirmed by GC/Mass Spectrometry. The sum-DDT concentration (range: 0.92-2.05 mg/kg fat) was age-dependent and indicated a decreasing trend since the 1970s. Mothers who recently came from mainland China had higher p,p′-DDT to p,p′-DDE ratios, suggesting a more recent exposure compared to women mainly residing in Hong Kong. The average Hong Kong sum-DDT level (1.50 mg/kg fat) was among the highest of the contemporary levels (range: 0.12-1.97 mg/kg fat; median: 0.40 mg/kg fat) in the 16 countries/regions participating in the 2002-03 WHO/EURO exposure study. This is probably due to the previous extensive DDT exposure and continuing use of DDT in agriculture in mainland China. Despite the apparent decrease of DDT body load over 30 years, the environmental health hazard from DDT contamination in the Pearl River Delta region remains a concern. Measures to eradicate illegal use of DDT in mainland China and regular food monitoring programs are needed in the region. Despite the presence of DDT and other persistent organic pollutants in human breast milk, breastfeeding should continue to be strongly supported for its life-long benefits to infants. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphereen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChemosphereen_HK
dc.subjectBreast milken_HK
dc.subjectDDDen_HK
dc.subjectDDEen_HK
dc.subjectDDTen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshBreast Feedingen_HK
dc.subject.meshChinaen_HK
dc.subject.meshDDT - analysis - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshData Interpretation, Statisticalen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Pollutants - analysis - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometryen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_HK
dc.subject.meshInterviews as Topicen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaternal Exposureen_HK
dc.subject.meshMilk, Human - chemistryen_HK
dc.titleDDT levels in human milk in Hong Kong, 2001-02en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0045-6535&volume=73&spage=50&epage=55&date=2008&atitle=DDT+levels+in+human+milk+in+Hong+Kong,+2001-02en_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, LL: huic@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ: hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHui, LL=rp01698en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chemosphere.2008.05.045en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18640700-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-48149106496en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros148485en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-48149106496&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume73en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage50en_HK
dc.identifier.epage55en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258904300008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, LL=12774460100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKypke, K=24542843800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNelson, EAS=7402264387en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, TW=7403531744en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridvan Leeuwen, FXR=7103402896en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMalisch, R=6701317539en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats