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Article: Pathways to obesity in a developing population: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitlePathways to obesity in a developing population: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
International Journal Of Epidemiology, 2009, v. 38 n. 1, p. 72-82 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: 'Environmental mismatch' may contribute to obesity in rapidly developing societies, because poor early life conditions could increase the risk of obesity in a subsequently more socio-economically developed environment. In a recently developing population (from southern China) we examined the association of life-course socio-economic position (SEP) with obesity. Methods: In a cross-sectional study of 9998 adults from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (phase 2) examined in 2005-06, we used multivariable linear regression to assess the association of SEP at three life stages (proxied by parental possessions, education and longest held occupation) with obesity [body mass index (BMI) and waist-hip ratio (WHR)] in men and women. Results: There was no evidence that socio-economic position trajectory had supra-additive effects on BMI or WHR. Instead in women, higher SEP at any life stage usually contributed to lower BMI and WHR; e.g. women with higher early adult SEP had lower BMI [-0.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.71 to -0.19) and WHR (-0.02; 95% CI -0.02 to -0.012]. In contrast, in men, higher childhood SEP was associated with higher BMI (0.53; 95% CI 0.18 to 0.88) and WHR (0.01; 95% CI 0.003 to 0.02) as was high late adulthood SEP with BMI (0.36; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.64). Conclusions: This study provides little support for environmental mismatch over the life course increasing obesity in this rapidly transitioning southern Chinese population. However, our findings highlight different effects of the epidemiologic transition in men and women, perhaps with pre-adult exposures as a critical window for sex-specific effects. © The Author 2008; all rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60291
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.522
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.381
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKavikondala, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:07:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:07:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Epidemiology, 2009, v. 38 n. 1, p. 72-82en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60291-
dc.description.abstractBackground: 'Environmental mismatch' may contribute to obesity in rapidly developing societies, because poor early life conditions could increase the risk of obesity in a subsequently more socio-economically developed environment. In a recently developing population (from southern China) we examined the association of life-course socio-economic position (SEP) with obesity. Methods: In a cross-sectional study of 9998 adults from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (phase 2) examined in 2005-06, we used multivariable linear regression to assess the association of SEP at three life stages (proxied by parental possessions, education and longest held occupation) with obesity [body mass index (BMI) and waist-hip ratio (WHR)] in men and women. Results: There was no evidence that socio-economic position trajectory had supra-additive effects on BMI or WHR. Instead in women, higher SEP at any life stage usually contributed to lower BMI and WHR; e.g. women with higher early adult SEP had lower BMI [-0.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.71 to -0.19) and WHR (-0.02; 95% CI -0.02 to -0.012]. In contrast, in men, higher childhood SEP was associated with higher BMI (0.53; 95% CI 0.18 to 0.88) and WHR (0.01; 95% CI 0.003 to 0.02) as was high late adulthood SEP with BMI (0.36; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.64). Conclusions: This study provides little support for environmental mismatch over the life course increasing obesity in this rapidly transitioning southern Chinese population. However, our findings highlight different effects of the epidemiologic transition in men and women, perhaps with pre-adult exposures as a critical window for sex-specific effects. © The Author 2008; all rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Epidemiology. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAnthropometry - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDeveloping Countriesen_HK
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Transitionen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshObesity - epidemiology - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocial Mobility - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshWaist-Hip Ratioen_HK
dc.titlePathways to obesity in a developing population: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-5771&volume=38&issue=1&spage=72&epage=82&date=2009&atitle=Pathways+to+obesity+in+a+developing+population:+The+Guangzhou+Biobank+Cohort+Studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ije/dyn221en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19036795-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-60149113038en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154417en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-60149113038&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage72en_HK
dc.identifier.epage82en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263164400011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKavikondala, S=14819602600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=13410704100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4090145-

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