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Article: Alcohol use and fasting glucose in a developing southern Chinese population: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitleAlcohol use and fasting glucose in a developing southern Chinese population: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2009, v. 63 n. 2, p. 121-127 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: In observational studies, mainly from Western Caucasian populations, moderate alcohol use has been shown to be associated with a lower risk of diabetes. However, whether the protection is due to the attributes of alcohol or to those of moderate alcohol users is difficult to disentangle. A population with a different distribution of alcohol consumption and diabetes prevalence from Western populations was studied as a counterfactual comparison. Methods: Baseline data from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study phases 1 and 2 (2003-6) were used to examine the adjusted associations, using multivariable censored linear regression, of alcohol use with fasting blood glucose in older (≥50 years) men (n = 5740) and women (n = 14 274) from southern China. Moderate alcohol use was defined as weekly drinking of ≤210 g alcohol in men and ≤140 g in women. The expected associations of alcohol with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and blood pressure were also checked. Results: Moderate alcohol users had very similar fasting glucose levels to never users, adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking and physical activity. In contrast, moderate alcohol users had higher HDL-cholesterol by 0.05 mmol/litre (95% CI 0.02 to 0.07). Excessive (more than moderate) alcohol users had higher fasting glucose. Conclusions: In an understudied population with a different pattern of alcohol use from the populations usually studied, the biologically expected effects of moderate alcohol use were seen, but there was little effect on fasting glucose. Although cross-sectional studies cannot be conclusive, this pattern of findings, if confirmed, suggests that moderate alcohol use may not affect fasting glucose, although excessive use may be a risk factor.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60288
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, UK
Funding Information:

The study was funded by the University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, and the University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China; and the University of Birmingham, UK. The funding sources had no role in any of the following: study design; the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; the writing of the report; and the decision to submit the paper for publication.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:07:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:07:37Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2009, v. 63 n. 2, p. 121-127en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60288-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In observational studies, mainly from Western Caucasian populations, moderate alcohol use has been shown to be associated with a lower risk of diabetes. However, whether the protection is due to the attributes of alcohol or to those of moderate alcohol users is difficult to disentangle. A population with a different distribution of alcohol consumption and diabetes prevalence from Western populations was studied as a counterfactual comparison. Methods: Baseline data from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study phases 1 and 2 (2003-6) were used to examine the adjusted associations, using multivariable censored linear regression, of alcohol use with fasting blood glucose in older (≥50 years) men (n = 5740) and women (n = 14 274) from southern China. Moderate alcohol use was defined as weekly drinking of ≤210 g alcohol in men and ≤140 g in women. The expected associations of alcohol with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and blood pressure were also checked. Results: Moderate alcohol users had very similar fasting glucose levels to never users, adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking and physical activity. In contrast, moderate alcohol users had higher HDL-cholesterol by 0.05 mmol/litre (95% CI 0.02 to 0.07). Excessive (more than moderate) alcohol users had higher fasting glucose. Conclusions: In an understudied population with a different pattern of alcohol use from the populations usually studied, the biologically expected effects of moderate alcohol use were seen, but there was little effect on fasting glucose. Although cross-sectional studies cannot be conclusive, this pattern of findings, if confirmed, suggests that moderate alcohol use may not affect fasting glucose, although excessive use may be a risk factor.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinking - blood - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, HDL - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshEthanol - administration & dosageen_HK
dc.subject.meshFasting - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen_HK
dc.titleAlcohol use and fasting glucose in a developing southern Chinese population: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2008.077602en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18930980-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-59949084636en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154276en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-59949084636&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume63en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage121en_HK
dc.identifier.epage127en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262408800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=13410704100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4130976-

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