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Article: Are height and leg length universal markers of childhood conditions? The Guangzhou Biobank cohort study

TitleAre height and leg length universal markers of childhood conditions? The Guangzhou Biobank cohort study
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2008, v. 62 n. 7, p. 607-614 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: In developed western populations longer legs have been shown to be a marker of better early childhood conditions. In the first generations to experience the epidemiologic transition and associated economic development, epigenetic constraints on growth might preclude improved childhood conditions from increasing leg growth or height. Design, setting and participants: Multivariable linear regression was used to assess the association of parental growth environment, proxied by parental literacy, and childhood conditions, proxied by parental possessions, with leg length, sitting height and height in a cross-sectional sample from 2005-6 of 9998 Chinese people aged at least 50 years from phase 2 of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Main results: Adjusted for age and sex, the association of childhood conditions with leg length and height varied with parental literacy (interaction p values <0.01 and 0.03), but not for sitting height (p value 0.43), with statistically significant trends (p values <0.01) for parental possessions to be associated with longer legs and greater height only in the offspring of two literate parents where legs were longer by 0.56 cm (95% CI 0.27 to 0.86) and height greater by 1.16 cm (95% CI 0.74 to 1.58) for participants with most, compared with least, parental possessions in childhood. Conclusions: Epigenetic influences originating in earlier generations may constrain growth during the infancy and/or childhood phases in very recently developed populations. Neither height nor leg length should be assumed to be consistent proxies of early life environment with corresponding implications for economic history, the aetiology of some chronic diseases and the monitoring of population health.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60283
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHeys, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAdab, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:07:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:07:31Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2008, v. 62 n. 7, p. 607-614en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60283-
dc.description.abstractObjective: In developed western populations longer legs have been shown to be a marker of better early childhood conditions. In the first generations to experience the epidemiologic transition and associated economic development, epigenetic constraints on growth might preclude improved childhood conditions from increasing leg growth or height. Design, setting and participants: Multivariable linear regression was used to assess the association of parental growth environment, proxied by parental literacy, and childhood conditions, proxied by parental possessions, with leg length, sitting height and height in a cross-sectional sample from 2005-6 of 9998 Chinese people aged at least 50 years from phase 2 of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Main results: Adjusted for age and sex, the association of childhood conditions with leg length and height varied with parental literacy (interaction p values <0.01 and 0.03), but not for sitting height (p value 0.43), with statistically significant trends (p values <0.01) for parental possessions to be associated with longer legs and greater height only in the offspring of two literate parents where legs were longer by 0.56 cm (95% CI 0.27 to 0.86) and height greater by 1.16 cm (95% CI 0.74 to 1.58) for participants with most, compared with least, parental possessions in childhood. Conclusions: Epigenetic influences originating in earlier generations may constrain growth during the infancy and/or childhood phases in very recently developed populations. Neither height nor leg length should be assumed to be consistent proxies of early life environment with corresponding implications for economic history, the aetiology of some chronic diseases and the monitoring of population health.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Heighten_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild Developmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshChinaen_HK
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLeg - anatomy & histology - growth & developmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMenarcheen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocial Conditions - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.titleAre height and leg length universal markers of childhood conditions? The Guangzhou Biobank cohort studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHeys, M: m_heys@lycos.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHeys, M=rp00257en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2007.065003en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18559443-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-46949094025en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros144490en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-46949094025&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume62en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage607en_HK
dc.identifier.epage614en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256807600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeys, M=22234232400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=13410704100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAdab, P=6601949045en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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