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Article: Elevated total cholesterol: Its prevalence and population attributable fraction for mortality from coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke in the Asia-Pacific region

TitleElevated total cholesterol: Its prevalence and population attributable fraction for mortality from coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke in the Asia-Pacific region
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.escardio.org/initiatives/journals/prevention
Citation
European Journal Of Cardiovascular Prevention And Rehabilitation, 2008, v. 15 n. 4, p. 397-401 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: About half of the world s cases of cardiovascular disease occur in the Asia-Pacific region. The contribution of serum total cholesterol (TC) to this burden is poorly quantified. Design: The most recent nationally representative data on TC distributions for countries in the region were sought. Individual participant data from 380 483 adults in the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration were used to estimate associations between TC and cardiovascular disease. Methods: High TC was defined as ≥6.2mmol/l, and nonoptimal TC as ≥ 3.8mmol/l. Hazard ratios for fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischaemic stroke (IS) were found from Cox models. Sex-specific population attributable fractions for high TC and nonoptimal TC were estimated for each country. The former used conventional methods, based on single measures of TC and a fixed dichotomy of risk strata; the latter took account of the continuous positive association between TC and both CHD and IS and regression dilution. Results: Data were available from 16 countries. Where reported, the prevalence of high TC ranged from 4 to 27%. The fraction of fatal CHD and IS attributable to high TC ranged from 0 to 14% and 0 to 15%, respectively. Although leaving the relative ranking of countries much the same, the fractions estimated for nonoptimal TC were typically at least twice as big, ranging from 0 to 47% and 0 to 35%, respectively. Conclusion: Conventional methods for estimating disease burden severely underestimate the effect of TC. Cholesterol-lowering strategies could have a tremendous effect in reducing cardiovascular deaths in this populous region. © 2008 The European Society of Cardiology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60267
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.691
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorMartiniuk, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYing Lee, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVanderhoorn, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorUeshima, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKim, HCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJamrozik, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuxley, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:07:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:07:13Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Cardiovascular Prevention And Rehabilitation, 2008, v. 15 n. 4, p. 397-401en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1741-8267en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60267-
dc.description.abstractBackground: About half of the world s cases of cardiovascular disease occur in the Asia-Pacific region. The contribution of serum total cholesterol (TC) to this burden is poorly quantified. Design: The most recent nationally representative data on TC distributions for countries in the region were sought. Individual participant data from 380 483 adults in the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration were used to estimate associations between TC and cardiovascular disease. Methods: High TC was defined as ≥6.2mmol/l, and nonoptimal TC as ≥ 3.8mmol/l. Hazard ratios for fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischaemic stroke (IS) were found from Cox models. Sex-specific population attributable fractions for high TC and nonoptimal TC were estimated for each country. The former used conventional methods, based on single measures of TC and a fixed dichotomy of risk strata; the latter took account of the continuous positive association between TC and both CHD and IS and regression dilution. Results: Data were available from 16 countries. Where reported, the prevalence of high TC ranged from 4 to 27%. The fraction of fatal CHD and IS attributable to high TC ranged from 0 to 14% and 0 to 15%, respectively. Although leaving the relative ranking of countries much the same, the fractions estimated for nonoptimal TC were typically at least twice as big, ranging from 0 to 47% and 0 to 35%, respectively. Conclusion: Conventional methods for estimating disease burden severely underestimate the effect of TC. Cholesterol-lowering strategies could have a tremendous effect in reducing cardiovascular deaths in this populous region. © 2008 The European Society of Cardiology.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.escardio.org/initiatives/journals/preventionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitationen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshAsia, Southeastern - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAustralia - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCholesterol - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshCoronary Disease - blood - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshStroke - blood - mortalityen_HK
dc.titleElevated total cholesterol: Its prevalence and population attributable fraction for mortality from coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke in the Asia-Pacific regionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/HJR.0b013e3282fdc967en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18677162en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-55249110237en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros148288en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-55249110237&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume15en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage397en_HK
dc.identifier.epage401en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258485500003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoodward, M=7102510958en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMartiniuk, A=15835035500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYing Lee, CM=25633296300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanderhoorn, S=25632907200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridUeshima, H=7005129002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, X=7401433023en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKim, HC=8540942600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRodgers, A=34971787100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPatel, A=7403524909en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJamrozik, K=26426193300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuxley, R=6701828350en_HK

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