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Article: A socio-historical hypothesis for the diabetes epidemic in Chinese - Preliminary observations from Hong Kong as a natural experiment

TitleA socio-historical hypothesis for the diabetes epidemic in Chinese - Preliminary observations from Hong Kong as a natural experiment
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1042-0533/
Citation
American Journal Of Human Biology, 2009, v. 21 n. 3, p. 346-353 How to Cite?
AbstractIt has been hypothesized that the emerging epidemic of diabetes in economically transitioning or recently transitioned populations is due to mismatch between developmental and mature environments. We took advantage of migration within an ethnically homogenous population to investigate this hypothesis, and the potentially modifying role of postnatal growth conditions, proxied by greater height. We used multivariable logistic regression in a population-based cross-sectional study from 1994 to 1996 of 2,341 long-term Hong Kong residents aged 25-74 years, either born in contemporaneously developed Hong Kong or migrants from economically undeveloped Guangdong. Migrant status was not associated with clinically diagnosed diabetes, odds ratio 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.69-1.58) in adult migrants compared to Hong Kong-born natives and 1.22 (0.83-1.80) in preadult migrants, adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic position, and lifestyle. However, the association of diabetes with migrant status varied with height, suggesting a potentially complex relationship between indicators of prenatal and postnatal nutritional exposures. Compared to tall Hong Kong-born natives, the odds ratio of diabetes was 2.36 (1.20-4.61) in tall migrants, 1.94 (1.07-3.53) in short Hong Kong-born natives, but 1.04 (0.48-2.23) in short adult migrants. Additionally adjusting for body mass index and waist-hip ratio had little effect, apart from attenuating the association between short height and diabetes prevalence in Hong Kong-born natives. Whether the current epidemic of diabetes is a long-standing effect of such mismatch or a "first-generation through effect" generated by rapid economic development causing disproportionate growth remains to be determined. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60266
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.875
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.018
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Health Services Research Committee411026
Hong Kong Research Grants Council407/94m
University of Hong Kong Committee on Research and Conference Grants
Hong Kong Society for the Aged
Funding Information:

Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong Health Services Research Committee; Contract grant number: HSRC# 411026; Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong Research Grants Council; Contract grant number: grant 407/94m; Contract grant sponsors: University of Hong Kong Committee on Research and Conference Grants, the Hong Kong Society for the Aged.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:07:12Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:07:12Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Human Biology, 2009, v. 21 n. 3, p. 346-353en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1042-0533en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60266-
dc.description.abstractIt has been hypothesized that the emerging epidemic of diabetes in economically transitioning or recently transitioned populations is due to mismatch between developmental and mature environments. We took advantage of migration within an ethnically homogenous population to investigate this hypothesis, and the potentially modifying role of postnatal growth conditions, proxied by greater height. We used multivariable logistic regression in a population-based cross-sectional study from 1994 to 1996 of 2,341 long-term Hong Kong residents aged 25-74 years, either born in contemporaneously developed Hong Kong or migrants from economically undeveloped Guangdong. Migrant status was not associated with clinically diagnosed diabetes, odds ratio 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.69-1.58) in adult migrants compared to Hong Kong-born natives and 1.22 (0.83-1.80) in preadult migrants, adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic position, and lifestyle. However, the association of diabetes with migrant status varied with height, suggesting a potentially complex relationship between indicators of prenatal and postnatal nutritional exposures. Compared to tall Hong Kong-born natives, the odds ratio of diabetes was 2.36 (1.20-4.61) in tall migrants, 1.94 (1.07-3.53) in short Hong Kong-born natives, but 1.04 (0.48-2.23) in short adult migrants. Additionally adjusting for body mass index and waist-hip ratio had little effect, apart from attenuating the association between short height and diabetes prevalence in Hong Kong-born natives. Whether the current epidemic of diabetes is a long-standing effect of such mismatch or a "first-generation through effect" generated by rapid economic development causing disproportionate growth remains to be determined. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1042-0533/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Human Biologyen_HK
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Human Biology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Heighten_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshDeveloped Countriesen_HK
dc.subject.meshDeveloping Countriesen_HK
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEmigrants and Immigrantsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_HK
dc.titleA socio-historical hypothesis for the diabetes epidemic in Chinese - Preliminary observations from Hong Kong as a natural experimenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1042-0533&volume=21&spage=346&epage=353&date=2009&atitle=A+socio-historical+hypothesis+for+the+diabetes+epidemic+in+Chinese+-+preliminary+observations+from+Hong+Kong+as+a+natural+experimenten_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ:bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajhb.20874en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19189413en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67449124315en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros155229en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67449124315&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage346en_HK
dc.identifier.epage353en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000265338200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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