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Article: Quantifying the influence of land-use and surface characteristics on spatial variability in the urban heat island

TitleQuantifying the influence of land-use and surface characteristics on spatial variability in the urban heat island
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer-Verlag Wien. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.at/tac
Citation
Theoretical And Applied Climatology, 2009, v. 95 n. 3-4, p. 397-406 How to Cite?
AbstractThe urban thermal environment varies not only from its rural surroundings but also within the urban area due to intra-urban differences in land-use and surface characteristics. Understanding the causes of this intra-urban variability is a first step in improving urban planning and development. Toward this end, a method for quantifying causes of spatial variability in the urban heat island has been developed. This paper presents the method as applied to a specific test case of Portland, Oregon. Vehicle temperature traverses were used to determine spatial differences in summertime ∼2 m air temperature across the metropolitan area in the afternoon. A tree-structured regression model was used to quantify the land-use and surface characteristics that have the greatest influence on daytime UHI intensity. The most important urban characteristic separating warmer from cooler regions of the Portland metropolitan area was canopy cover. Roadway area density was also an important determinant of local UHI magnitudes. Specifically, the air above major arterial roads was found to be warmer on weekdays than weekends, possibly due to increased anthropogenic activity from the vehicle sector on weekdays. In general, warmer regions of the city were associated with industrial and commercial land-use. The downtown core, whilst warmer than the rural surroundings, was not the warmest part of the Portland metropolitan area. This is thought to be due in large part to local shading effects in the urban canyons. © Springer-Verlag 2008.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60235
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.433
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.030
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Science Foundation0410103
Funding Information:

The authors wish to thank the various participants in the traverse measurements. We also thank Kevin Martin, GIS specialist with the City of Portland Bureau of Planning for providing the GIS data. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0410103. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHart, MAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSailor, DJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:06:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:06:29Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTheoretical And Applied Climatology, 2009, v. 95 n. 3-4, p. 397-406en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0177-798Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60235-
dc.description.abstractThe urban thermal environment varies not only from its rural surroundings but also within the urban area due to intra-urban differences in land-use and surface characteristics. Understanding the causes of this intra-urban variability is a first step in improving urban planning and development. Toward this end, a method for quantifying causes of spatial variability in the urban heat island has been developed. This paper presents the method as applied to a specific test case of Portland, Oregon. Vehicle temperature traverses were used to determine spatial differences in summertime ∼2 m air temperature across the metropolitan area in the afternoon. A tree-structured regression model was used to quantify the land-use and surface characteristics that have the greatest influence on daytime UHI intensity. The most important urban characteristic separating warmer from cooler regions of the Portland metropolitan area was canopy cover. Roadway area density was also an important determinant of local UHI magnitudes. Specifically, the air above major arterial roads was found to be warmer on weekdays than weekends, possibly due to increased anthropogenic activity from the vehicle sector on weekdays. In general, warmer regions of the city were associated with industrial and commercial land-use. The downtown core, whilst warmer than the rural surroundings, was not the warmest part of the Portland metropolitan area. This is thought to be due in large part to local shading effects in the urban canyons. © Springer-Verlag 2008.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlag Wien. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.at/tacen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTheoretical and Applied Climatologyen_HK
dc.titleQuantifying the influence of land-use and surface characteristics on spatial variability in the urban heat islanden_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0177-798X&volume=95&spage=397&epage=406&date=2009&atitle=Quantifying+the+influence+of+land-use+and+surface+characteristics+on+spatial+variability+in+the+urban+heat+islanden_HK
dc.identifier.emailHart, MA:mhart@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHart, MA=rp00645en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00704-008-0017-5en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-62249142122en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros156218en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-62249142122&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume95en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage397en_HK
dc.identifier.epage406en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263899800015-
dc.publisher.placeAustriaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHart, MA=15044213100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSailor, DJ=7003306487en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4155195-

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