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Article: Theories of Job Stress and the Role of Traditional Values: A Longitudinal Study in China

TitleTheories of Job Stress and the Role of Traditional Values: A Longitudinal Study in China
Authors
Keywordsemployee health
job control
job demands
organizational justice
traditionality
Issue Date2008
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/apl.html
Citation
Journal Of Applied Psychology, 2008, v. 93 n. 4, p. 831-848 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examines how traditionality influences the relationships between job stressors and health. A sample of 496 Chinese employees provided longitudinal questionnaire data, and their health was assessed by collecting blood samples and monitoring blood pressure. The results indicated that the positive relationship between job control and health was stronger among the less traditional workers, whereas the positive relationship between distributive justice and health was stronger among the more traditional workers. Furthermore, traditionality moderated the interactive effects of job demands and perceived control/justice on health. Perceiving higher control mitigated the effects of job demands on upper respiratory infections among low traditionalists, but it exacerbated the effects among the high traditionalists. Perceptions of higher justice mitigated the effects of job demands on emotional exhaustion and immunoglobulin A for high traditionalists but not for low traditionalists. These results suggest that, in the relationship between job demands and psychological and physiological health, concern for equity is an important moderator for individuals with more traditional values, whereas perceived personal control is salutary for health primarily among people with less traditional values. © 2008 American Psychological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60233
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.81
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.641
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXie, JLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchaubroeck, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, SSKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:06:22Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:06:22Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Applied Psychology, 2008, v. 93 n. 4, p. 831-848en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0021-9010en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60233-
dc.description.abstractThis study examines how traditionality influences the relationships between job stressors and health. A sample of 496 Chinese employees provided longitudinal questionnaire data, and their health was assessed by collecting blood samples and monitoring blood pressure. The results indicated that the positive relationship between job control and health was stronger among the less traditional workers, whereas the positive relationship between distributive justice and health was stronger among the more traditional workers. Furthermore, traditionality moderated the interactive effects of job demands and perceived control/justice on health. Perceiving higher control mitigated the effects of job demands on upper respiratory infections among low traditionalists, but it exacerbated the effects among the high traditionalists. Perceptions of higher justice mitigated the effects of job demands on emotional exhaustion and immunoglobulin A for high traditionalists but not for low traditionalists. These results suggest that, in the relationship between job demands and psychological and physiological health, concern for equity is an important moderator for individuals with more traditional values, whereas perceived personal control is salutary for health primarily among people with less traditional values. © 2008 American Psychological Association.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/apl.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Applied Psychologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Applied Psychology. Copyright © American Psychological Association.en_HK
dc.subjectemployee healthen_HK
dc.subjectjob controlen_HK
dc.subjectjob demandsen_HK
dc.subjectorganizational justiceen_HK
dc.subjecttraditionalityen_HK
dc.titleTheories of Job Stress and the Role of Traditional Values: A Longitudinal Study in Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0021-9010&volume=93&spage=831&epage=848&date=2008&atitle=Theories+of+Job+Stress+and+the+Role+of+Traditional+Values:+A+Longitudinal+Study+in+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, SSK: simonlam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, SSK=rp01071en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/0021-9010.93.4.831en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18642987-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-48049106450en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros143903en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-48049106450&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume93en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage831en_HK
dc.identifier.epage848en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1939-1854-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257680700009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXie, JL=7402994138en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchaubroeck, J=7003293292en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SSK=35218940100en_HK

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