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Article: Does the job satisfaction-job performance relationship vary across cultures?

TitleDoes the job satisfaction-job performance relationship vary across cultures?
Authors
KeywordsCulture
Job performance
Job satisfaction
Moderator
National culture
Issue Date2009
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=197
Citation
Journal Of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 2009, v. 40 n. 5, p. 761-796 How to Cite?
AbstractThe purpose of this study is to examine whether culture moderates the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance. Multiple theoretical frameworks regarding culture are used as the theoretical guide. Based on meta-analytical moderator tests, the authors find some support for their hypotheses that the effect size for the job satisfaction-job performance relationship is likely to be stronger in individualistic (vs. collectivistic) cultures, in low-power-distance (vs. high-power-distance) cultures, in low-uncertainty-avoidance (vs. high-uncertainty-avoidance) cultures, and in masculine (vs. feminine) cultures. They also observe stronger evidence of these effects for task performance than for contextual performance. Implications for theory, practice, and future research are discussed. © 2009 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60204
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.795
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.308
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, TWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSorensen, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYim, Fen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:05:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:05:51Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 2009, v. 40 n. 5, p. 761-796en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-0221en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60204-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to examine whether culture moderates the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance. Multiple theoretical frameworks regarding culture are used as the theoretical guide. Based on meta-analytical moderator tests, the authors find some support for their hypotheses that the effect size for the job satisfaction-job performance relationship is likely to be stronger in individualistic (vs. collectivistic) cultures, in low-power-distance (vs. high-power-distance) cultures, in low-uncertainty-avoidance (vs. high-uncertainty-avoidance) cultures, and in masculine (vs. feminine) cultures. They also observe stronger evidence of these effects for task performance than for contextual performance. Implications for theory, practice, and future research are discussed. © 2009 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=197en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychologyen_HK
dc.subjectCultureen_HK
dc.subjectJob performanceen_HK
dc.subjectJob satisfactionen_HK
dc.subjectModeratoren_HK
dc.subjectNational cultureen_HK
dc.titleDoes the job satisfaction-job performance relationship vary across cultures?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, TWH: twhng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, TWH=rp01088en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0022022109339208en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70350125562en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros157448en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70350125562&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage761en_HK
dc.identifier.epage796en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269255900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, TWH=8564407300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSorensen, KL=8564407500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYim, F=36796184100en_HK

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