File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: How broadly does education contribute to job performance?

TitleHow broadly does education contribute to job performance?
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PEPS
Citation
Personnel Psychology, 2009, v. 62 n. 1, p. 89-134 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study looks at the effects of education level on job performance in 2 ways. First, it provides a meta-analysis on the relationships between education level and 9 dimensions of job behaviors representing task, citizenship, and counterproductive performance. Results here show that, in addition to positively influencing core task performance, education level is also positively related to creativity and citizenship behaviors and negatively related to on-the-job substance use and absenteeism. Second, we investigate the moderating effects of sample and research design characteristics on the relationships between education and job performance. Significant results were found for gender, race, job level, and job complexity. The article concludes with implications for future research and the management of an increasingly educated workforce. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60202
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.744
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, TWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFeldman, DCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:05:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:05:49Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPersonnel Psychology, 2009, v. 62 n. 1, p. 89-134en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-5826en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60202-
dc.description.abstractThis study looks at the effects of education level on job performance in 2 ways. First, it provides a meta-analysis on the relationships between education level and 9 dimensions of job behaviors representing task, citizenship, and counterproductive performance. Results here show that, in addition to positively influencing core task performance, education level is also positively related to creativity and citizenship behaviors and negatively related to on-the-job substance use and absenteeism. Second, we investigate the moderating effects of sample and research design characteristics on the relationships between education and job performance. Significant results were found for gender, race, job level, and job complexity. The article concludes with implications for future research and the management of an increasingly educated workforce. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PEPSen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPersonnel Psychologyen_HK
dc.titleHow broadly does education contribute to job performance?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0031-5826&volume=62&spage=89&epage=134&date=2008&atitle=How+broadly+does+education+contribute+to+job+performance?en_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, TWH: twhng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, TWH=rp01088en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1744-6570.2008.01130.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-59549088733en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros143502en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-59549088733&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume62en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage89en_HK
dc.identifier.epage134en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263047600004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, TWH=8564407300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFeldman, DC=7402702773en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4021201-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats