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Article: China's minorities without written scripts: The case of education access among the Dongxiang

TitleChina's minorities without written scripts: The case of education access among the Dongxiang
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Co
Citation
Journal Of Asian Pacific Communication, 2008, v. 18 n. 2, p. 166-189 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Chinese state sees language as an essential determinant in ethnic minority schooling. The use of minority language as a medium of instruction is viewed as a way to increase attendance rates and strengthen socialization into a national ideology. However, the policies differ for those ethnic miorities with or without a commonly used written script. Among the minorities without a script are the 300,000 strong Dongxiang, an ethnic group with the lowest level of literacy and school access in China. There is virtually no systematic research on the role of language in school access for Chinese minority groups without a written script. In particular, there is a lack of analysis of the Dongxiang (and similar groups without a written script) learning and school discontinuation. This research aimed to identity the major difficulties in school based learning for the Dongxiang speaking children. Specifically, it explores local perspectives on how language and other factors are related to school enrolment and achievement. In order to accomplish this, the research combined a variety of data gathering methods, including survey questionnaires, open ended interviews, in-depth interviews, field visits, observations, and case studies to analyze the difficulties of language transition faced by Dongxiang ethnic minority children. The results reveal that although native language does not directly cause schoolchildren to discontinue their studies, it has an important indirect influence, especially on the girls. The research results also show that Dongxiang ethnic minority schoolchildren in the early years of schooling generally cannot understand their teachers' Chinese teaching, which results in poor school performances, a decline of interest in learning, a frustrated sense of achievement, and a decline in self-respect. Many students drop out as part of a vicious cycle that sees a reproduction of poor conditions for learning. © John Benjamins Publishing Company.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60079
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.152
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPostiglione, GAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:03:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:03:16Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Asian Pacific Communication, 2008, v. 18 n. 2, p. 166-189en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0957-6851en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60079-
dc.description.abstractThe Chinese state sees language as an essential determinant in ethnic minority schooling. The use of minority language as a medium of instruction is viewed as a way to increase attendance rates and strengthen socialization into a national ideology. However, the policies differ for those ethnic miorities with or without a commonly used written script. Among the minorities without a script are the 300,000 strong Dongxiang, an ethnic group with the lowest level of literacy and school access in China. There is virtually no systematic research on the role of language in school access for Chinese minority groups without a written script. In particular, there is a lack of analysis of the Dongxiang (and similar groups without a written script) learning and school discontinuation. This research aimed to identity the major difficulties in school based learning for the Dongxiang speaking children. Specifically, it explores local perspectives on how language and other factors are related to school enrolment and achievement. In order to accomplish this, the research combined a variety of data gathering methods, including survey questionnaires, open ended interviews, in-depth interviews, field visits, observations, and case studies to analyze the difficulties of language transition faced by Dongxiang ethnic minority children. The results reveal that although native language does not directly cause schoolchildren to discontinue their studies, it has an important indirect influence, especially on the girls. The research results also show that Dongxiang ethnic minority schoolchildren in the early years of schooling generally cannot understand their teachers' Chinese teaching, which results in poor school performances, a decline of interest in learning, a frustrated sense of achievement, and a decline in self-respect. Many students drop out as part of a vicious cycle that sees a reproduction of poor conditions for learning. © John Benjamins Publishing Company.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Coen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Asian Pacific Communicationen_HK
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT ‘This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.-
dc.titleChina's minorities without written scripts: The case of education access among the Dongxiangen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0957-6851&volume=18&issue=2&spage=166&epage=189&date=2008&atitle=China’s+Minorities+Without+Written+Scripts:+The+Case+of+Education+Access+among+the+Dongxiangen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPostiglione, GA: gerry@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPostiglione, GA=rp00951en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1075/japc.18.2.04posen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-49149103386en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros158159en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-49149103386&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage166en_HK
dc.identifier.epage189en_HK
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, J=24529222100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPostiglione, GA=6602471517en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3156857-

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