File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Work-related Musculoskeletal Symptoms in Surgeons
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleWork-related Musculoskeletal Symptoms in Surgeons
 
AuthorsSzeto, GPY2
Ho, P1
Ting, ACW1
Poon, JTC1
Cheng, SWK1
Tsang, RCC3
 
KeywordsErgonomics
Laparoscopic and endovascular surgery
Psychosocial
Surgeons
Work-related musculoskeletal symptoms
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1053-0487
 
CitationJournal Of Occupational Rehabilitation, 2009, v. 19 n. 2, p. 175-184 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10926-009-9176-1
 
AbstractIntroduction Surgeons are a unique group of healthcare professionals who are at risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms (WMS). The diversity of operating skills for laparoscopic and endovascular procedures impose different physical demands on surgeons, who also work under time pressure. The present study aims to examine the physical and psychosocial factors and their association with WMS among general surgeons in Hong Kong. Method A survey was conducted among surgeons working in the General Surgery departments in public hospitals of Hong Kong. Over 500 questionnaires were mailed and 135 surgeons completed the survey successfully (response rate 27%). Questions included demographics, workload, ergonomic and psychosocial factors. The relationship of these factors with WMS symptoms in the past 12 months was examined. Results Results indicated a high prevalence rate of WMS symptoms in surgeons, mainly in the neck (82.9%), low back (68.1%), shoulder (57.8%) and upper back (52.6%) regions. Sustained static and/or awkward posture was perceived as the factor most commonly associated with neck symptoms by 88.9% of respondents. Logistic regression showed the total score for physical ergonomic factors was the most significant predictor for all 4 body regions of musculoskeletal symptoms, with OR of 2.028 (95%CI 1.29-3.19) for the neck, 1.809 (1.34-2.43) for shoulder and 1.716 (1.24-2.37) for the lower back. Workstyle score was significantly associated with the symptom severity in the low back region (P = .003) but not with the other regions. Conclusion These results confirmed a strong association of physical and psychosocial factors with the musculoskeletal symptoms in surgeons. There is a potential for such musculoskeletal symptoms to escalate in the future, with rapid advances and increasing application of minimally invasive surgery. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
 
ISSN1053-0487
2012 Impact Factor: 2.061
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.057
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10926-009-9176-1
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000265710000006
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSzeto, GPY
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, P
 
dc.contributor.authorTing, ACW
 
dc.contributor.authorPoon, JTC
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, SWK
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, RCC
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:00:10Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:00:10Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Surgeons are a unique group of healthcare professionals who are at risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms (WMS). The diversity of operating skills for laparoscopic and endovascular procedures impose different physical demands on surgeons, who also work under time pressure. The present study aims to examine the physical and psychosocial factors and their association with WMS among general surgeons in Hong Kong. Method A survey was conducted among surgeons working in the General Surgery departments in public hospitals of Hong Kong. Over 500 questionnaires were mailed and 135 surgeons completed the survey successfully (response rate 27%). Questions included demographics, workload, ergonomic and psychosocial factors. The relationship of these factors with WMS symptoms in the past 12 months was examined. Results Results indicated a high prevalence rate of WMS symptoms in surgeons, mainly in the neck (82.9%), low back (68.1%), shoulder (57.8%) and upper back (52.6%) regions. Sustained static and/or awkward posture was perceived as the factor most commonly associated with neck symptoms by 88.9% of respondents. Logistic regression showed the total score for physical ergonomic factors was the most significant predictor for all 4 body regions of musculoskeletal symptoms, with OR of 2.028 (95%CI 1.29-3.19) for the neck, 1.809 (1.34-2.43) for shoulder and 1.716 (1.24-2.37) for the lower back. Workstyle score was significantly associated with the symptom severity in the low back region (P = .003) but not with the other regions. Conclusion These results confirmed a strong association of physical and psychosocial factors with the musculoskeletal symptoms in surgeons. There is a potential for such musculoskeletal symptoms to escalate in the future, with rapid advances and increasing application of minimally invasive surgery. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Occupational Rehabilitation, 2009, v. 19 n. 2, p. 175-184 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10926-009-9176-1
 
dc.identifier.citeulike4381221
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10926-009-9176-1
 
dc.identifier.epage184
 
dc.identifier.hkuros157184
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000265710000006
 
dc.identifier.issn1053-0487
2012 Impact Factor: 2.061
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.057
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19381790
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67349248422
 
dc.identifier.spage175
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59920
 
dc.identifier.volume19
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1053-0487
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Occupational Rehabilitation
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies
 
dc.subject.meshEndoscopy
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGeneral Surgery
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveys
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMusculoskeletal Diseases - etiology
 
dc.subject.meshOccupational Diseases
 
dc.subject.meshPhysicians
 
dc.subject.meshPosture
 
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
 
dc.subject.meshWorkload
 
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
 
dc.subjectErgonomics
 
dc.subjectLaparoscopic and endovascular surgery
 
dc.subjectPsychosocial
 
dc.subjectSurgeons
 
dc.subjectWork-related musculoskeletal symptoms
 
dc.titleWork-related Musculoskeletal Symptoms in Surgeons
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Szeto, GPY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ho, P</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ting, ACW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Poon, JTC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheng, SWK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tsang, RCC</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2010-05-31T04:00:10Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2010-05-31T04:00:10Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2009</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Journal Of Occupational Rehabilitation, 2009, v. 19 n. 2, p. 175-184</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1053-0487</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/59920</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Introduction Surgeons are a unique group of healthcare professionals who are at risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms (WMS). The diversity of operating skills for laparoscopic and endovascular procedures impose different physical demands on surgeons, who also work under time pressure. The present study aims to examine the physical and psychosocial factors and their association with WMS among general surgeons in Hong Kong. Method A survey was conducted among surgeons working in the General Surgery departments in public hospitals of Hong Kong. Over 500 questionnaires were mailed and 135 surgeons completed the survey successfully (response rate 27%). Questions included demographics, workload, ergonomic and psychosocial factors. The relationship of these factors with WMS symptoms in the past 12 months was examined. Results Results indicated a high prevalence rate of WMS symptoms in surgeons, mainly in the neck (82.9%), low back (68.1%), shoulder (57.8%) and upper back (52.6%) regions. Sustained static and/or awkward posture was perceived as the factor most commonly associated with neck symptoms by 88.9% of respondents. Logistic regression showed the total score for physical ergonomic factors was the most significant predictor for all 4 body regions of musculoskeletal symptoms, with OR of 2.028 (95%CI 1.29-3.19) for the neck, 1.809 (1.34-2.43) for shoulder and 1.716 (1.24-2.37) for the lower back. Workstyle score was significantly associated with the symptom severity in the low back region (P = .003) but not with the other regions. Conclusion These results confirmed a strong association of physical and psychosocial factors with the musculoskeletal symptoms in surgeons. There is a potential for such musculoskeletal symptoms to escalate in the future, with rapid advances and increasing application of minimally invasive surgery. &#169; 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Springer New York LLC. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&amp;issn=1053-0487</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation</relation.ispartof>
<subject>Ergonomics</subject>
<subject>Laparoscopic and endovascular surgery</subject>
<subject>Psychosocial</subject>
<subject>Surgeons</subject>
<subject>Work-related musculoskeletal symptoms</subject>
<subject.mesh>Adult</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Cross-Sectional Studies</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Endoscopy</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Female</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>General Surgery</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Health Surveys</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Hong Kong</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Laparoscopy</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Male</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Musculoskeletal Diseases - etiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Occupational Diseases</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Physicians</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Posture</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Questionnaires</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Workload</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Young Adult</subject.mesh>
<title>Work-related Musculoskeletal Symptoms in Surgeons</title>
<type>Article</type>
<identifier.openurl>http://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&amp;issn=1053-0487&amp;volume=19&amp;spage=175&amp;epage=184&amp;date=2009&amp;atitle=Work-related+musculoskeletal+symptoms+in+surgeons</identifier.openurl>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1007/s10926-009-9176-1</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>19381790</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-67349248422</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>157184</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67349248422&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>19</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>2</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>175</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>184</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000265710000006</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United States</publisher.place>
<identifier.citeulike>4381221</identifier.citeulike>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  3. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong