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Article: Clinical implications of anterolateral thigh flap shrinkage

TitleClinical implications of anterolateral thigh flap shrinkage
Authors
KeywordsAnterolateral thigh flap
Associate factors
AutoCAD
Flap design
Flap shrinkage
Predictive model
Prospective study
Issue Date2008
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.laryngoscope.com/
Citation
Laryngoscope, 2008, v. 118 n. 4, p. 585-588 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate anterolateral thigh flap shrinkage after elevation and to develop a predictive model for flap design. METHOD: A prospective study was conducted in a university teaching hospital. The skin islands from anterolateral thigh flaps were outlined on a transparent sheet before and after the reconstruction procedure. Dimensions of the stretched flaps were also recorded. These three outlines were scanned and the surface areas computed and compared by tracing and use of AutoCAD. Age, sex, flap dimension, and flap thickness were investigated for association with flap shrinkage. RESULTS: Forty-five anterolateral thigh flaps harvested for head and neck soft tissue reconstruction after tumor resection were studied. Flap size ranged from 4 to 14 cm in width and 8 to 22 cm in length; flap area ranged from 30.6 to 151.0 cm. On average, the flaps shrunk by 25.0% (6.2%-52.6%), a highly significant change (P < .01). Flap width and thickness correlated with the reduction in flap size. The average stretched-flap area was 10.1% (0.4%-29.4%) less than the preflap area, a significant reduction (P < .01). The difference between stretched-flap and preflap areas was independent of all variables. We developed a predictive model using a stepwise multiple linear regression method with a coefficient of determination of 0.495. CONCLUSIONS: Anterolateral thigh flaps shrink after harvesting, and flap width and thickness are significant contributing variables. These findings indicate that flap size must take shrinkage into account to ensure sufficient coverage. © The American Laryngological, Rhinological & Otological Society, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59892
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.272
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.342
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, RWMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, JYWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMok, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, MSCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, APWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:59:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:59:35Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLaryngoscope, 2008, v. 118 n. 4, p. 585-588en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0023-852Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59892-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate anterolateral thigh flap shrinkage after elevation and to develop a predictive model for flap design. METHOD: A prospective study was conducted in a university teaching hospital. The skin islands from anterolateral thigh flaps were outlined on a transparent sheet before and after the reconstruction procedure. Dimensions of the stretched flaps were also recorded. These three outlines were scanned and the surface areas computed and compared by tracing and use of AutoCAD. Age, sex, flap dimension, and flap thickness were investigated for association with flap shrinkage. RESULTS: Forty-five anterolateral thigh flaps harvested for head and neck soft tissue reconstruction after tumor resection were studied. Flap size ranged from 4 to 14 cm in width and 8 to 22 cm in length; flap area ranged from 30.6 to 151.0 cm. On average, the flaps shrunk by 25.0% (6.2%-52.6%), a highly significant change (P < .01). Flap width and thickness correlated with the reduction in flap size. The average stretched-flap area was 10.1% (0.4%-29.4%) less than the preflap area, a significant reduction (P < .01). The difference between stretched-flap and preflap areas was independent of all variables. We developed a predictive model using a stepwise multiple linear regression method with a coefficient of determination of 0.495. CONCLUSIONS: Anterolateral thigh flaps shrink after harvesting, and flap width and thickness are significant contributing variables. These findings indicate that flap size must take shrinkage into account to ensure sufficient coverage. © The American Laryngological, Rhinological & Otological Society, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.laryngoscope.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLaryngoscopeen_HK
dc.subjectAnterolateral thigh flapen_HK
dc.subjectAssociate factorsen_HK
dc.subjectAutoCADen_HK
dc.subjectFlap designen_HK
dc.subjectFlap shrinkageen_HK
dc.subjectPredictive modelen_HK
dc.subjectProspective studyen_HK
dc.titleClinical implications of anterolateral thigh flap shrinkageen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, JYW: jywchan1@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, JYW=rp01314en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MLG.0b013e31816067a3en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18176347-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-41849105087en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros166304en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros141512-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-41849105087&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume118en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage585en_HK
dc.identifier.epage588en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000260662000003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, RWM=7102153861en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JYW=27171772200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, V=23467468700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, MSC=23995383300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, APW=7006290111en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_HK

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