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Article: Built environment and children's academic performance - A Hong Kong perspective

TitleBuilt environment and children's academic performance - A Hong Kong perspective
Authors
KeywordsChildren's development
Environment
Land use
Issue Date2009
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatint
Citation
Habitat International, 2009, v. 33 n. 1, p. 45-51 How to Cite?
AbstractStudies around the world have shown that there is a significant correlation between young children's development and the neighbourhood environment in which they are brought up. While the neighbourhood environment is a master set of a vast number of inter-dependent and inter-mingled variables, one particular factor, the physical land use environment sometimes tends to be overlooked. In fact, all other environmental variables work inside the framework of the land use settings as all human activities take place on and above land and certainly within some form of physical structure. In this paper, we try to provide some insights into this particular aspect by a relatively quantitative analysis. A major youth survey was carried out and views from the young people on two major aspects of land use settings are collated. In the micro-system, we examine how the physical land use system affects young people and how much they enjoy it. In the macro level, we tally their views on certain land use policy objectives and examine how much they can and are willing to articulate their views. We have found that land use environment in the neighbourhood does impose important effects on young people and they do recognise that. However, young people seem not being able to capitalize the benefits of the "routine activities" due to various reasons, and among them management of public space is a major one. In general, we feel that there is an inadequate government effort in trying to stimulate young people's interest in contributing to the debate of urban land use policy, making most young children rather indifferent on a number of socio-economic land use issues. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59765
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.029
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.038
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLing Hin, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:56:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:56:58Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHabitat International, 2009, v. 33 n. 1, p. 45-51en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0197-3975en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59765-
dc.description.abstractStudies around the world have shown that there is a significant correlation between young children's development and the neighbourhood environment in which they are brought up. While the neighbourhood environment is a master set of a vast number of inter-dependent and inter-mingled variables, one particular factor, the physical land use environment sometimes tends to be overlooked. In fact, all other environmental variables work inside the framework of the land use settings as all human activities take place on and above land and certainly within some form of physical structure. In this paper, we try to provide some insights into this particular aspect by a relatively quantitative analysis. A major youth survey was carried out and views from the young people on two major aspects of land use settings are collated. In the micro-system, we examine how the physical land use system affects young people and how much they enjoy it. In the macro level, we tally their views on certain land use policy objectives and examine how much they can and are willing to articulate their views. We have found that land use environment in the neighbourhood does impose important effects on young people and they do recognise that. However, young people seem not being able to capitalize the benefits of the "routine activities" due to various reasons, and among them management of public space is a major one. In general, we feel that there is an inadequate government effort in trying to stimulate young people's interest in contributing to the debate of urban land use policy, making most young children rather indifferent on a number of socio-economic land use issues. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatinten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHabitat Internationalen_HK
dc.subjectChildren's developmenten_HK
dc.subjectEnvironmenten_HK
dc.subjectLand useen_HK
dc.titleBuilt environment and children's academic performance - A Hong Kong perspectiveen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0197-3975&volume=33&issue=1&spage=45&epage=51&date=2009&atitle=Built+environment+and+children%27s+academic+performance:+a+Hong+Kong+perspectiveen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLing Hin, L:lhli@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLing Hin, L=rp01010en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.habitatint.2008.04.001en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-56949085464en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros167936en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-56949085464&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume33en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage45en_HK
dc.identifier.epage51en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262208700006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLing Hin, L=8418463000en_HK

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