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Article: Scholastic achievement at age 16 and risk of schizophrenia and other psychoses: A national cohort study

TitleScholastic achievement at age 16 and risk of schizophrenia and other psychoses: A national cohort study
Authors
KeywordsBipolar disorder
Cognitive function
Cohort study
Epidemiology
Schizophrenia
Issue Date2008
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2008, v. 38 n. 8, p. 1133-1140 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: There is abundant evidence that schizophrenia is associated with cognitive deficits in childhood. However, previous studies investigating school performance have been inconclusive. Furthermore, there are several biological and social factors that could confound the association. We investigated whether school performance at age 16 is associated with risk of adult schizophrenia and other psychoses in a large national cohort, while controlling for multiple confounders. Method: Using a national sample of 907 011 individuals born in Sweden between 1973 and 1983, we used Cox regression to assess whether scholastic achievement at age 15-16 predicted hospital admission for psychosis between ages 17 and 31, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Poor school performance was associated with increased rates of schizophrenia [hazard ratio (HR) 3.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-5.3], schizo-affective disorder (HR 4.2, 95% CI 1.9-9.1) and other psychoses (HR 3.0, 95% CI 2.3-4.0). Receiving the lowest (E) grade was significantly associated with risk for schizophrenia and other psychoses in every school subject. There was no evidence of confounding by migrant status, low birthweight, hypoxia, parental education level or socio-economic group. Conclusions: Poor school performance across all domains is strongly associated with risk for schizophrenia and other psychoses. Copyright © 2007 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59722
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMacCabe, JHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLambe, MPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCnattingius, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTorrång, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBjörk, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDavid, ASen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHultman, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:56:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:56:05Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2008, v. 38 n. 8, p. 1133-1140en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59722-
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is abundant evidence that schizophrenia is associated with cognitive deficits in childhood. However, previous studies investigating school performance have been inconclusive. Furthermore, there are several biological and social factors that could confound the association. We investigated whether school performance at age 16 is associated with risk of adult schizophrenia and other psychoses in a large national cohort, while controlling for multiple confounders. Method: Using a national sample of 907 011 individuals born in Sweden between 1973 and 1983, we used Cox regression to assess whether scholastic achievement at age 15-16 predicted hospital admission for psychosis between ages 17 and 31, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Poor school performance was associated with increased rates of schizophrenia [hazard ratio (HR) 3.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-5.3], schizo-affective disorder (HR 4.2, 95% CI 1.9-9.1) and other psychoses (HR 3.0, 95% CI 2.3-4.0). Receiving the lowest (E) grade was significantly associated with risk for schizophrenia and other psychoses in every school subject. There was no evidence of confounding by migrant status, low birthweight, hypoxia, parental education level or socio-economic group. Conclusions: Poor school performance across all domains is strongly associated with risk for schizophrenia and other psychoses. Copyright © 2007 Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsPsychological Medicine. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectBipolar disorderen_HK
dc.subjectCognitive functionen_HK
dc.subjectCohort studyen_HK
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_HK
dc.titleScholastic achievement at age 16 and risk of schizophrenia and other psychoses: A national cohort studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0033-2917&volume=38&spage=1133&epage=1140&date=2008&atitle=Scholastic+achievement+at+age+16+and+risk+of+schizophrenia+and+other+psychoses:+a+national+cohort+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291707002048en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17988422en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-46749157476en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros158299en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-46749157476&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1133en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1140en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258058300007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacCabe, JH=7003607616en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLambe, MP=7004394431en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCnattingius, S=7006687777en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTorrång, A=12769894000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBjörk, C=14520960400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, PC=34573429300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDavid, AS=7402606754en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, RM=35406239400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHultman, CM=7004101287en_HK

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