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Article: Abnormal spatiotemporal processing of emotional facial expressions in childhood autism: Dipole source analysis of event-related potentials

TitleAbnormal spatiotemporal processing of emotional facial expressions in childhood autism: Dipole source analysis of event-related potentials
Authors
KeywordsBESA
Brain
Electroencephalography
Emotion
Faces
Issue Date2008
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EJN
Citation
European Journal Of Neuroscience, 2008, v. 28 n. 2, p. 407-416 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious studies of face processing in autism suggest abnormalities in anatomical development, functioning and connectivity/coordination of distributed brain systems involved in social cognition, but the spatial sequence and time course of rapid (sub-second) neural responses to emotional facial expressions have not been examined in detail. Source analysis of high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) is an optimal means to examine both the precise temporal profile and spatial location of early electrical brain activity in response to emotionally salient stimuli. Therefore, we recorded 128-channel ERPs from high-functioning males with autism (aged 6-10 years), and age-, sex- and IQ-matched typically developing controls during explicit and implicit processing of emotion from pictures showing happy, angry, fearful, sad and neutral facial expressions. Children with autism showed normal patterns of behavioural and ERP (P1, N170 and P2) responses. However, dipole source analysis revealed that ERP responses relating to face detection (visual cortex) and configural processing of faces (fusiform gyrus), as well as mental state decoding (medial prefrontal lobe), were significantly weaker and/or slower in autism compared with controls during both explicit and implicit emotion-processing tasks. Slower- and larger-amplitude ERP source activity in the parietal somatosensory cortices possibly reflected more effortful compensatory analytical strategies used by the autism group to process facial gender and emotion. Such aberrant neurophysiological processing of facial emotion observed in children with autism within the first 300 ms of stimulus presentation suggests abnormal cortical specialization within social brain networks, which would likely disrupt the development of normal social-cognitive skills. © The Authors (2008).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59693
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 3.181
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.908
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, TKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, PCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChua, SEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcAlonan, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:55:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:55:31Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Neuroscience, 2008, v. 28 n. 2, p. 407-416en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0953-816Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59693-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies of face processing in autism suggest abnormalities in anatomical development, functioning and connectivity/coordination of distributed brain systems involved in social cognition, but the spatial sequence and time course of rapid (sub-second) neural responses to emotional facial expressions have not been examined in detail. Source analysis of high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) is an optimal means to examine both the precise temporal profile and spatial location of early electrical brain activity in response to emotionally salient stimuli. Therefore, we recorded 128-channel ERPs from high-functioning males with autism (aged 6-10 years), and age-, sex- and IQ-matched typically developing controls during explicit and implicit processing of emotion from pictures showing happy, angry, fearful, sad and neutral facial expressions. Children with autism showed normal patterns of behavioural and ERP (P1, N170 and P2) responses. However, dipole source analysis revealed that ERP responses relating to face detection (visual cortex) and configural processing of faces (fusiform gyrus), as well as mental state decoding (medial prefrontal lobe), were significantly weaker and/or slower in autism compared with controls during both explicit and implicit emotion-processing tasks. Slower- and larger-amplitude ERP source activity in the parietal somatosensory cortices possibly reflected more effortful compensatory analytical strategies used by the autism group to process facial gender and emotion. Such aberrant neurophysiological processing of facial emotion observed in children with autism within the first 300 ms of stimulus presentation suggests abnormal cortical specialization within social brain networks, which would likely disrupt the development of normal social-cognitive skills. © The Authors (2008).en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EJNen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Neuroscienceen_HK
dc.rightsEuropean Journal of Neuroscience. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectBESAen_HK
dc.subjectBrainen_HK
dc.subjectElectroencephalographyen_HK
dc.subjectEmotionen_HK
dc.subjectFacesen_HK
dc.titleAbnormal spatiotemporal processing of emotional facial expressions in childhood autism: Dipole source analysis of event-related potentialsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0953-816X&volume=28&issue=2&spage=407&epage=416&date=2008&atitle=Abnormal+spatiotemporal+processing+of+emotional+facial+expressions+in+childhood+autism:+dipole+source+analysis+of+event-related+potentialsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChua, SE: sechua@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcAlonan, GM: mcalonan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChua, SE=rp00438en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcAlonan, GM=rp00475en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1460-9568.2008.06328.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18702712-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-48349105168en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros146623en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-48349105168&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage407en_HK
dc.identifier.epage416en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257715800018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, TKW=7403531187en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, PCW=7101613315en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChua, SE=7201550427en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcAlonan, GM=6603123011en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3020828-

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