File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Prevalence of hereditary prosopagnosia (HPA) in Hong Kong Chinese population

TitlePrevalence of hereditary prosopagnosia (HPA) in Hong Kong Chinese population
Authors
KeywordsAutosomal dominant
Chinese
Congenital prosopagnosia (CPA)
Face blindness
Hereditary prosopagnosia (HPA)
Prevalence
Prosopagnosia (PA)
Issue Date2008
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jabout/33129/ProductInformation.html
Citation
American Journal Of Medical Genetics, Part A, 2008, v. 146 n. 22, p. 2863-2870 How to Cite?
AbstractProsopagnosia (PA), or the inability to recognize a familiar person by the face alone, had been considered to be a rare dysfunction mainly acquired by trauma to the brain. Recently we have shown that the congenital form of PA, which was considered to be even rarer, is common in Caucasians, with a prevalence of 2.5%. As these cases were familial we coined the term Hereditary Prosopagnosia (HPA). The present study is the first systematic screening for HPA in a defined population of ethnic Chinese. In 2004-2005, 533 out of around 750 medical students of The University of Hong Kong took part in a questionnaire-based screening. The responses of 133 students indicated that they were likely to be candidates for PA. One hundred twenty agreed for diagnostic interview. Finally we made the clinical diagnosis of PA in 10 subjects. A prevalence of 1.88% (95% CI, 1.05-2.71) is established which is in the same range as in Caucasians. We took a detailed family history of four index prosopagnosic persons and were able to further investigate the families of four probands. Each had other first-degree relatives with the same visual cognitive dysfunction. Thus, as in the Caucasians, regular autosomal dominant inheritance might best explain the segregation pattern. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59527
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.082
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.115
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKennerknecht, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorNga, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, VCNen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:52:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:52:01Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Medical Genetics, Part A, 2008, v. 146 n. 22, p. 2863-2870en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1552-4825en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59527-
dc.description.abstractProsopagnosia (PA), or the inability to recognize a familiar person by the face alone, had been considered to be a rare dysfunction mainly acquired by trauma to the brain. Recently we have shown that the congenital form of PA, which was considered to be even rarer, is common in Caucasians, with a prevalence of 2.5%. As these cases were familial we coined the term Hereditary Prosopagnosia (HPA). The present study is the first systematic screening for HPA in a defined population of ethnic Chinese. In 2004-2005, 533 out of around 750 medical students of The University of Hong Kong took part in a questionnaire-based screening. The responses of 133 students indicated that they were likely to be candidates for PA. One hundred twenty agreed for diagnostic interview. Finally we made the clinical diagnosis of PA in 10 subjects. A prevalence of 1.88% (95% CI, 1.05-2.71) is established which is in the same range as in Caucasians. We took a detailed family history of four index prosopagnosic persons and were able to further investigate the families of four probands. Each had other first-degree relatives with the same visual cognitive dysfunction. Thus, as in the Caucasians, regular autosomal dominant inheritance might best explain the segregation pattern. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jabout/33129/ProductInformation.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics, Part Aen_HK
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics Part A. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectAutosomal dominanten_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectCongenital prosopagnosia (CPA)en_HK
dc.subjectFace blindnessen_HK
dc.subjectHereditary prosopagnosia (HPA)en_HK
dc.subjectPrevalenceen_HK
dc.subjectProsopagnosia (PA)en_HK
dc.titlePrevalence of hereditary prosopagnosia (HPA) in Hong Kong Chinese populationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1552-4825&volume=146A&spage=2863&epage=2870&date=2008&atitle=Prevalence+of+Hereditary+Prosopagnosia+(HPA)+in+Hong+Kong+Chinese+Populationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, VCN:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, VCN=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajmg.a.32552en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18925678-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-56049114712en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros153940en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-56049114712&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume146en_HK
dc.identifier.issue22en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2863en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2870en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000260846800004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKennerknecht, I=21134959300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNga, YH=52864397900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VCN=7202525632en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats