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Article: Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD): Comparison of chinese and western culture (Part A)

TitleUse of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD): Comparison of chinese and western culture (Part A)
Authors
KeywordsAcupuncture
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
Children
Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)
Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0162-3257
Citation
Journal Of Autism And Developmental Disorders, 2009, v. 39 n. 3, p. 454-463 How to Cite?
AbstractA cross-sectional survey of the use of CAM by children was undertaken in the Duchess of Kent Children's Hospital in Hong Kong (March-December 2006). A questionnaire survey concerning the use of CAM was administered to chief caretakers (only the mothers) who accompanied children with neurodevelopmental disabilities followed up in our Neurodevelopmental paediatrics clinics. Four hundred and thirty agreed for interview of which 98 (22.8%) had Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). CAM was used in 40.8% for ASD and 21.4% of non-ASD (p < 0.001). We describe the profile of use of CAM in ASD in this part A paper. The three most common type of CAM use was Acupuncture (47.5%), Sensory Integration (42.5%), and Chinese Medicine (30%). About 76.9% of interviewees expected CAM to augment conventional treatment. Although 47.5% used both conventional western medicine and CAM, only 22.4% disclosed the use of CAM to Doctors. The following factors were significantly related to CAM use: father's job and mother's religion. Our frequency of CAM used in children with ASD was lower in Canada (52%) and USA (74%, 92%). The main CAM use in western culture was biological-based therapy whereas acupuncture was the most common CAM used in our locality. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59525
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.493
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.877
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, VCNen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:51:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:51:59Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Autism And Developmental Disorders, 2009, v. 39 n. 3, p. 454-463en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0162-3257en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59525-
dc.description.abstractA cross-sectional survey of the use of CAM by children was undertaken in the Duchess of Kent Children's Hospital in Hong Kong (March-December 2006). A questionnaire survey concerning the use of CAM was administered to chief caretakers (only the mothers) who accompanied children with neurodevelopmental disabilities followed up in our Neurodevelopmental paediatrics clinics. Four hundred and thirty agreed for interview of which 98 (22.8%) had Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). CAM was used in 40.8% for ASD and 21.4% of non-ASD (p < 0.001). We describe the profile of use of CAM in ASD in this part A paper. The three most common type of CAM use was Acupuncture (47.5%), Sensory Integration (42.5%), and Chinese Medicine (30%). About 76.9% of interviewees expected CAM to augment conventional treatment. Although 47.5% used both conventional western medicine and CAM, only 22.4% disclosed the use of CAM to Doctors. The following factors were significantly related to CAM use: father's job and mother's religion. Our frequency of CAM used in children with ASD was lower in Canada (52%) and USA (74%, 92%). The main CAM use in western culture was biological-based therapy whereas acupuncture was the most common CAM used in our locality. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0162-3257en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Autism and Developmental Disordersen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectAcupunctureen_HK
dc.subjectAutism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)en_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectComplementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)en_HK
dc.subjectTraditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)en_HK
dc.subject.meshAutistic Disorder - therapy-
dc.subject.meshComplementary Therapies - classification - ethics - methods-
dc.subject.meshDevelopmental Disabilities - therapy-
dc.subject.meshHerbal Medicine - ethics - methods-
dc.subject.meshIntegrative Medicine - ethics - methods-
dc.titleUse of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD): Comparison of chinese and western culture (Part A)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0162-3257&volume=39&issue=3&spage=454&epage=463&date=2009&atitle=Use+of+complementary+and+alternative+medicine+(CAM)+in+autism+spectrum+disorder+(ASD):+comparison+of+Chinese+and+western+culture+(Part+A)en_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, VCN:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, VCN=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10803-008-0644-9en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18784992en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-59849129350en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros151598en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-59849129350&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage454en_HK
dc.identifier.epage463en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263143800008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VCN=7202525632en_HK

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