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Article: Novel astroviruses in insectivorous bats

TitleNovel astroviruses in insectivorous bats
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
Citation
Journal Of Virology, 2008, v. 82 n. 18, p. 9107-9114 How to Cite?
AbstractBats are increasingly recognized to harbor a wide range of viruses, and in most instances these viruses appear to establish long-term persistence in these animals. They are the reservoir of a number of human zoonotic diseases including Nipah, Ebola, and severe acute respiratory syndrome. We report the identification of novel groups of astroviruses in apparently healthy insectivorous bats found in Hong Kong, in particular, bats belonging to the genera Miniopterus and Myotis. Astroviruses are important causes of diarrhea in many animal species, including humans. Many of the bat astroviruses form distinct phylogenetic clusters in the genus Mamastrovirus within the family Astroviridae. Virus detection rates of 36% to 100% and 50% to 70% were found in Miniopterus magnater and Miniopterus pusillus bats, respectively, captured within a single bat habitat during four consecutive visits spanning 1 year. There was high genetic diversity of viruses in bats found within this single habitat. Some bat astroviruses may be phylogenetically related to human astroviruses, and further studies with a wider range of bat species in different geographic locations are warranted. These findings are likely to provide new insights into the ecology and evolution of astroviruses and reinforce the role of bats as a reservoir of viruses with potential to pose a zoonotic threat to human health. Copyright © 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59445
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.347
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Institutes of HealthHHSN266200700005C
University of Hong Kong
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China
Funding Information:

This project was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIAID contract HHSN266200700005C) and by a Research Excellence Award to J.S.M.P. from The University of Hong Kong. The study was approved and supported by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, DKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LLMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:50:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:50:13Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Virology, 2008, v. 82 n. 18, p. 9107-9114en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-538Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59445-
dc.description.abstractBats are increasingly recognized to harbor a wide range of viruses, and in most instances these viruses appear to establish long-term persistence in these animals. They are the reservoir of a number of human zoonotic diseases including Nipah, Ebola, and severe acute respiratory syndrome. We report the identification of novel groups of astroviruses in apparently healthy insectivorous bats found in Hong Kong, in particular, bats belonging to the genera Miniopterus and Myotis. Astroviruses are important causes of diarrhea in many animal species, including humans. Many of the bat astroviruses form distinct phylogenetic clusters in the genus Mamastrovirus within the family Astroviridae. Virus detection rates of 36% to 100% and 50% to 70% were found in Miniopterus magnater and Miniopterus pusillus bats, respectively, captured within a single bat habitat during four consecutive visits spanning 1 year. There was high genetic diversity of viruses in bats found within this single habitat. Some bat astroviruses may be phylogenetically related to human astroviruses, and further studies with a wider range of bat species in different geographic locations are warranted. These findings are likely to provide new insights into the ecology and evolution of astroviruses and reinforce the role of bats as a reservoir of viruses with potential to pose a zoonotic threat to human health. Copyright © 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Virology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.titleNovel astroviruses in insectivorous batsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-538X&volume=82&spage=9107&epage=9114&date=2008&atitle=Novel+astroviruses+in+insectivorous+bats.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoon, LLM: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, LLM=rp00484en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.00857-08en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18550669-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-50949127759en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros149328en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-50949127759&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume82en_HK
dc.identifier.issue18en_HK
dc.identifier.spage9107en_HK
dc.identifier.epage9114en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000259152000015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, DKW=7201734326en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, LLM=7005441747en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK

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