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Article: Coronavirus diversity, phylogeny and interspecies jumping

TitleCoronavirus diversity, phylogeny and interspecies jumping
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherSociety for Experimental Biology and Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ebmonline.org/
Citation
Experimental Biology And Medicine, 2009, v. 234 n. 10, p. 1117-1127 How to Cite?
AbstractThe SARS epidemic has boosted interest in research on coronavirus biodiversity and genomics. Before 2003, there were only 10 coronaviruses with complete genomes available. After the SARS epidemic, up to December 2008, there was an addition of 16 coronaviruses with complete genomes sequenced. These include two human coronaviruses (human coronavirus NL63 and human coronavirus HKU1), 10 other mammalian coronaviruses [bat SARS coronavirus, bat coronavirus (bat-CoV) HKU2, bat-CoV HKU4, bat-CoV HKU5, bat-CoV HKU8, bat-CoV HKU9, bat-CoV 512/2005, bat-CoV 1A, equine coronavirus, and beluga whale coronavirus] and four avian coronaviruses (turkey coronavirus, bulbul coronavirus HKU11, thrush coronavirus HKU12, and munia coronavirus HKU13). Two novel subgroups in group 2 coronavirus (groups 2c and 2d) and two novel subgroups in group 3 coronavirus (groups 3b and 3c) have been proposed. The diversity of coronaviruses is a result of the infidelity of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, high frequency of homologous RNA recombination, and the large genomes of coronaviruses. Among all hosts, the diversity of coronaviruses is most evidenced in bats and birds, which may be a result of their species diversity, ability to fly, environmental pressures, and habits of roosting and flocking. The present evidence supports that bat coronaviruses are the gene pools of group 1 and 2 coronaviruses, whereas bird coronaviruses are the gene pools of group 3 coronaviruses. With the increasing number of coronaviruses, more and more closely related coronaviruses from distantly related animals have been observed, which were results of recent interspecies jumping and may be the cause of disastrous outbreaks of zoonotic diseases. Copyright © 2009 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59438
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.542
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.991
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Consultancy, Service for Enhancing Laboratory Surveillance of Emerging Infectious Disease for the Department of Health or the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China780709
University Development Fund
Outstanding Young Researcher Award
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This work was partly supported by the Consultancy, Service for Enhancing Laboratory Surveillance of Emerging Infectious Disease for the Department of Health or the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China; the Research Grant Council Grant (780709), University Development Fund, Outstanding Young Researcher Award,The University of Hong Kong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:50:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:50:05Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Biology And Medicine, 2009, v. 234 n. 10, p. 1117-1127en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1535-3702en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59438-
dc.description.abstractThe SARS epidemic has boosted interest in research on coronavirus biodiversity and genomics. Before 2003, there were only 10 coronaviruses with complete genomes available. After the SARS epidemic, up to December 2008, there was an addition of 16 coronaviruses with complete genomes sequenced. These include two human coronaviruses (human coronavirus NL63 and human coronavirus HKU1), 10 other mammalian coronaviruses [bat SARS coronavirus, bat coronavirus (bat-CoV) HKU2, bat-CoV HKU4, bat-CoV HKU5, bat-CoV HKU8, bat-CoV HKU9, bat-CoV 512/2005, bat-CoV 1A, equine coronavirus, and beluga whale coronavirus] and four avian coronaviruses (turkey coronavirus, bulbul coronavirus HKU11, thrush coronavirus HKU12, and munia coronavirus HKU13). Two novel subgroups in group 2 coronavirus (groups 2c and 2d) and two novel subgroups in group 3 coronavirus (groups 3b and 3c) have been proposed. The diversity of coronaviruses is a result of the infidelity of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, high frequency of homologous RNA recombination, and the large genomes of coronaviruses. Among all hosts, the diversity of coronaviruses is most evidenced in bats and birds, which may be a result of their species diversity, ability to fly, environmental pressures, and habits of roosting and flocking. The present evidence supports that bat coronaviruses are the gene pools of group 1 and 2 coronaviruses, whereas bird coronaviruses are the gene pools of group 3 coronaviruses. With the increasing number of coronaviruses, more and more closely related coronaviruses from distantly related animals have been observed, which were results of recent interspecies jumping and may be the cause of disastrous outbreaks of zoonotic diseases. Copyright © 2009 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for Experimental Biology and Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ebmonline.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Biology and Medicineen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCoronavirus - classification - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenetic Variationen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenome, Viralen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpecies Specificityen_HK
dc.titleCoronavirus diversity, phylogeny and interspecies jumpingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP:skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3181/0903-MR-94en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19546349-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349669409en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros167076en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70349669409&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume234en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1117en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1127en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000270347800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, Y=35597414700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK

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