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Article: Avian influenza A H5N1 infections in Bali province, Indonesia: A behavioral, virological and seroepidemiological study

TitleAvian influenza A H5N1 infections in Bali province, Indonesia: A behavioral, virological and seroepidemiological study
Authors
KeywordsAvian influenza
H5N1 virus
Indonesia
Pigs
Risk factors
Seroepidemiological study
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=1750-2640&site=1
Citation
Influenza And Other Respiratory Viruses, 2009, v. 3 n. 3, p. 81-89 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Bali Province was affected by avian influenza H5N1 outbreaks in birds in October 2003. Despite ongoing circulation of the virus, no human infection had been identified by December 2005. Objectives: To assess behavioral patterns associated with poultry rearing in Bali, and to identify potential risk factors for H5N1 infection in humans and in household chickens, ducks and pigs. Methods: A behavioral, virological and seroepidemiologic survey in 38 villages and three live bird markets was completed in December 2005. A multi-stage cluster design was used to select 291 households with 841 participants from all nine districts in Bali. Specimens were collected from participants as well as a maximum of three pigs, chickens and ducks from each household. Eighty-seven market vendors participated, where specimens were collected from participants as well as chickens and ducks. Results: Twenty out of the 38 villages sampled had H5N1 outbreaks. Despite exposure to H5N1 outbreaks, none of the participants from villages or markets were seropositive for H5N1. None of the pigs tested were positive for H5N1. Virus isolation rate in ducks and chicken in markets was higher than in households. Transport of poultry in or out of villages was a risk factor for outbreaks in household chickens and ducks. Conclusions: The study highlighted that the market chain and associated behaviors may play a role in maintaining the virus in household flocks. The study adds evidence that transmission of H5N1 to humans remains a rare event despite high level handling of both healthy and sick birds. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59430
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.378
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.570
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSanthia, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorRamy, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJayaningsih, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaan, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPutra, AAGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDibia, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSulaimin, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJoni, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CYHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMalik Peiris, JSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWandra, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorKandun, Nen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:49:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:49:56Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInfluenza And Other Respiratory Viruses, 2009, v. 3 n. 3, p. 81-89en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1750-2640en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59430-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Bali Province was affected by avian influenza H5N1 outbreaks in birds in October 2003. Despite ongoing circulation of the virus, no human infection had been identified by December 2005. Objectives: To assess behavioral patterns associated with poultry rearing in Bali, and to identify potential risk factors for H5N1 infection in humans and in household chickens, ducks and pigs. Methods: A behavioral, virological and seroepidemiologic survey in 38 villages and three live bird markets was completed in December 2005. A multi-stage cluster design was used to select 291 households with 841 participants from all nine districts in Bali. Specimens were collected from participants as well as a maximum of three pigs, chickens and ducks from each household. Eighty-seven market vendors participated, where specimens were collected from participants as well as chickens and ducks. Results: Twenty out of the 38 villages sampled had H5N1 outbreaks. Despite exposure to H5N1 outbreaks, none of the participants from villages or markets were seropositive for H5N1. None of the pigs tested were positive for H5N1. Virus isolation rate in ducks and chicken in markets was higher than in households. Transport of poultry in or out of villages was a risk factor for outbreaks in household chickens and ducks. Conclusions: The study highlighted that the market chain and associated behaviors may play a role in maintaining the virus in household flocks. The study adds evidence that transmission of H5N1 to humans remains a rare event despite high level handling of both healthy and sick birds. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=1750-2640&site=1en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInfluenza and other Respiratory Virusesen_HK
dc.subjectAvian influenzaen_HK
dc.subjectH5N1 virusen_HK
dc.subjectIndonesiaen_HK
dc.subjectPigsen_HK
dc.subjectRisk factorsen_HK
dc.subjectSeroepidemiological studyen_HK
dc.titleAvian influenza A H5N1 infections in Bali province, Indonesia: A behavioral, virological and seroepidemiological studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, CYH: cyhleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMalik Peiris, JS: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, CYH=rp00307en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMalik Peiris, JS=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1750-2659.2009.00069.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19459276-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65249155944en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros162837en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-65249155944&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage81en_HK
dc.identifier.epage89en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267762100001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSanthia, K=26531765800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRamy, A=26531735000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJayaningsih, P=26531406500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaan, G=6602382950en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPutra, AAG=6507431263en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDibia, N=26531135200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSulaimin, C=26532159500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJoni, G=26531314900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, CYH=26531438300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMalik Peiris, JS=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWandra, T=6603103477en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKandun, N=6506352905en_HK

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