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Article: Characterization of avian influenza viruses A (H5N1) from wild birds, Hong Kong, 2004-2008
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TitleCharacterization of avian influenza viruses A (H5N1) from wild birds, Hong Kong, 2004-2008
 
AuthorsSmith, GJD3
Vijaykrishna, D3
Ellis, TM2
Dyrting, KC2
Leung, YHC3
Bahl, J3
Wong, CW2
Kai, H3
Chow, MKW2
Duan, L3
Chan, ASL2
Zhang, LJ3
Chen, H3
Luk, GSM2
Peiris, JSM3 4
Guan, Y3 1
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htm
 
CitationEmerging Infectious Diseases, 2009, v. 15 n. 3, p. 402-407 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1503.081190
 
AbstractFrom January 2004 through June 2008, surveillance of dead wild birds in Hong Kong, People's Republic of China, periodically detected highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses (H5N1) in individual birds from different species. During this period, no viruses of subtype H5N1 were detected in poultry on farms and in markets in Hong Kong despite intensive surveillance. Thus, these findings in wild birds demonstrate the potential for wild birds to disseminate HPAI viruses (H5N1) to areas otherwise free from the viruses. Genetic and antigenic characterization of 47 HPAI (H5N1) viruses isolated from dead wild birds in Hong Kong showed that these isolates belonged to 2 antigenically distinct virus groups: clades 2.3.4 and 2.3.2. Although research has shown that clade 2.3.4 viruses are established in poultry in Asia, the emergence of clade 2.3.2 viruses in nonpasserine birds from Hong Kong, Japan, and Russia raises the possibility that this virus lineage may have become established in wild birds.
 
ISSN1080-6040
2012 Impact Factor: 5.993
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.345
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1503.081190
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000263759400006
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants CouncilHKU 7512/06M
Hong Kong SAR Government
Area Excellence Scheme
University Grants CommitteeAoE/M-12/6
National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID]HHSN266200700005C
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the Research Grants Council (HKU 7512/06M) of the Hong Kong SAR Government, the Area Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee (grant AoE/M-12/6), and the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID] contract HHSN266200700005C). G.J.D.S. is supported by a career development award under NIAID contract HHSN266200700005C.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsThe role of migratory birds in the transmission of H5N1 Influenza virus in eastern Asia
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GJD
 
dc.contributor.authorVijaykrishna, D
 
dc.contributor.authorEllis, TM
 
dc.contributor.authorDyrting, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YHC
 
dc.contributor.authorBahl, J
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, CW
 
dc.contributor.authorKai, H
 
dc.contributor.authorChow, MKW
 
dc.contributor.authorDuan, L
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, ASL
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, LJ
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, H
 
dc.contributor.authorLuk, GSM
 
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM
 
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Y
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:49:14Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:49:14Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractFrom January 2004 through June 2008, surveillance of dead wild birds in Hong Kong, People's Republic of China, periodically detected highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses (H5N1) in individual birds from different species. During this period, no viruses of subtype H5N1 were detected in poultry on farms and in markets in Hong Kong despite intensive surveillance. Thus, these findings in wild birds demonstrate the potential for wild birds to disseminate HPAI viruses (H5N1) to areas otherwise free from the viruses. Genetic and antigenic characterization of 47 HPAI (H5N1) viruses isolated from dead wild birds in Hong Kong showed that these isolates belonged to 2 antigenically distinct virus groups: clades 2.3.4 and 2.3.2. Although research has shown that clade 2.3.4 viruses are established in poultry in Asia, the emergence of clade 2.3.2 viruses in nonpasserine birds from Hong Kong, Japan, and Russia raises the possibility that this virus lineage may have become established in wild birds.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEmerging Infectious Diseases, 2009, v. 15 n. 3, p. 402-407 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1503.081190
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1503.081190
 
dc.identifier.epage407
 
dc.identifier.hkuros157669
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263759400006
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants CouncilHKU 7512/06M
Hong Kong SAR Government
Area Excellence Scheme
University Grants CommitteeAoE/M-12/6
National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID]HHSN266200700005C
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the Research Grants Council (HKU 7512/06M) of the Hong Kong SAR Government, the Area Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee (grant AoE/M-12/6), and the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID] contract HHSN266200700005C). G.J.D.S. is supported by a career development award under NIAID contract HHSN266200700005C.

 
dc.identifier.issn1080-6040
2012 Impact Factor: 5.993
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.345
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19239752
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-63849162414
 
dc.identifier.spage402
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59395
 
dc.identifier.volume15
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htm
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofEmerging Infectious Diseases
 
dc.relation.projectThe role of migratory birds in the transmission of H5N1 Influenza virus in eastern Asia
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Wild - virology
 
dc.subject.meshBird Diseases - epidemiology - virology
 
dc.subject.meshBirds - virology
 
dc.subject.meshHemagglutination Inhibition Tests
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza in Birds - epidemiology - virology
 
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Data
 
dc.subject.meshPhylogeny
 
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reaction
 
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, DNA
 
dc.titleCharacterization of avian influenza viruses A (H5N1) from wild birds, Hong Kong, 2004-2008
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Fisheries and Conservation Department
  3. The University of Hong Kong
  4. HKU-Pasteur Research Centre