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Article: Gastroesophageal reflux disease is associated with poor asthma control, quality of life, and psychological status in Chinese asthma patients
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TitleGastroesophageal reflux disease is associated with poor asthma control, quality of life, and psychological status in Chinese asthma patients
 
AuthorsCheung, TK
Lam, B
Lam, KF1
Ip, M
Ng, C
Kung, R
Wong, BCY1
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherAmerican College of Chest Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.chestjournal.org
 
CitationChest, 2009, v. 135 n. 5, p. 1181-1185 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1378/chest.08-1702
 
AbstractBackground: Both asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are common, often coexist, and have significant impact on a patient's quality of life. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of GERD in asthmatic patients at a major hospital in Hong Kong, and to examine the impact of GERD and its association with asthma control. Methods: Patients with asthma who attended the respiratory clinic at Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, were recruited. Demographic data were collected, and a validated Chinese GERD questionnaire was used. The Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form (SF-36) was used to assess quality of life, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to assess psychological status. Asthma control was assessed by the asthma control test. Results: A total of 218 patients were recruited; 40.4% of asthmatic patients (88 patients) had GERD, as defined by the GERD questionnaire. Compared with those patients without GERD, those with GERD had significantly worse asthma control (p = 0.022), worse quality of life in all domains of the SF-36 (all p < 0.01), and more anxiety (6.82 vs 4.90, respectively; p < 0.001) and depression (6.09 vs 4.05, respectively; p < 0.001) as reflected by HADSs. Conclusions: A significant proportion of asthmatic patients in Hong Kong have GERD, and this is associated with poorer asthmatic control, quality of life, and psychological status. Copyright © 2009 American College of Chest Physicians.
 
ISSN0012-3692
2013 Impact Factor: 7.132
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.432
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1378/chest.08-1702
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000265876100012
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TK
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, B
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, KF
 
dc.contributor.authorIp, M
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, C
 
dc.contributor.authorKung, R
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCY
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:47:57Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:47:57Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Both asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are common, often coexist, and have significant impact on a patient's quality of life. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of GERD in asthmatic patients at a major hospital in Hong Kong, and to examine the impact of GERD and its association with asthma control. Methods: Patients with asthma who attended the respiratory clinic at Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, were recruited. Demographic data were collected, and a validated Chinese GERD questionnaire was used. The Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form (SF-36) was used to assess quality of life, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to assess psychological status. Asthma control was assessed by the asthma control test. Results: A total of 218 patients were recruited; 40.4% of asthmatic patients (88 patients) had GERD, as defined by the GERD questionnaire. Compared with those patients without GERD, those with GERD had significantly worse asthma control (p = 0.022), worse quality of life in all domains of the SF-36 (all p < 0.01), and more anxiety (6.82 vs 4.90, respectively; p < 0.001) and depression (6.09 vs 4.05, respectively; p < 0.001) as reflected by HADSs. Conclusions: A significant proportion of asthmatic patients in Hong Kong have GERD, and this is associated with poorer asthmatic control, quality of life, and psychological status. Copyright © 2009 American College of Chest Physicians.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationChest, 2009, v. 135 n. 5, p. 1181-1185 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1378/chest.08-1702
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1378/chest.08-1702
 
dc.identifier.epage1185
 
dc.identifier.hkuros157341
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000265876100012
 
dc.identifier.issn0012-3692
2013 Impact Factor: 7.132
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.432
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19118263
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65949105259
 
dc.identifier.spage1181
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59336
 
dc.identifier.volume135
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican College of Chest Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.chestjournal.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofChest
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAnxiety - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshAsthma - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshComorbidity
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGastroesophageal Reflux - epidemiology - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Status Indicators
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPrevalence
 
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life
 
dc.titleGastroesophageal reflux disease is associated with poor asthma control, quality of life, and psychological status in Chinese asthma patients
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Ng, C</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong