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Article: Disagreement in preference for residential care between family caregivers and elders is greater among cognitively impaired elders group than cognitively intact elders group
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TitleDisagreement in preference for residential care between family caregivers and elders is greater among cognitively impaired elders group than cognitively intact elders group
 
AuthorsChau, PH1
Kwok, T3
Woo, J3
Chan, F1
Hui, E2
Chan, KC3
 
KeywordsCaregiver burden
Cognitive impairment
Depression
Elders
Old age home
Residential care
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2010, v. 25 n. 1, p. 46-54 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.2296
 
AbstractObjectives: This study examined the predictive factors of preference for residential care in cognitively intact and impaired elders and their family caregivers. It was hypothesized that disagreement in preference for residential care between the elders and their caregivers was greater in the cognitively impaired. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted during June 2007 to March 2008 in Hong Kong, and 707 community-dwelling elders aged 65 and above and 705 family caregivers were interviewed. Cognitively impaired elders were over-sampled to give reliable estimates for that sub-group. A structural questionnaire was used to collect data on preference for residential care and potential factors. Logistic regression was used to identify the predictors. Results: More cognitively impaired elder-caregiver dyads (37.4%) had disagreement in preference for residential care than cognitively intact elder-caregiver dyads (20.5%) ( p<.001). From the elders' perspective, less preference for residential care was associated with cognitive impairment, whereas greater preference was associated with depression (for cognitively intact elders), more usage of community service and functional impairment. From the caregivers' perspective, greater preference for residential care was associated with greater caregiver burden, or care-recipients having cognitive or functional impairment, or more usage of community services. Conclusions: Cognitively intact elders were more likely to indicate preference for residential care than cognitively impaired elders. Elders, both cognitively intact and impaired, were less likely than their caregivers to indicate preference for residential care. Disagreement in preference for residential care between the elders and their caregivers was larger for the cognitively impaired group than the cognitively intact group. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
 
ISSN0885-6230
2012 Impact Factor: 2.977
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.086
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.2296
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000273514500007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust
Funding Information:

This study is part of the project entitled 'CADENZA: A Jockey Club Initiative for Seniors' funded by The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChau, PH
 
dc.contributor.authorKwok, T
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, J
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, F
 
dc.contributor.authorHui, E
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KC
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:46:02Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:46:02Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This study examined the predictive factors of preference for residential care in cognitively intact and impaired elders and their family caregivers. It was hypothesized that disagreement in preference for residential care between the elders and their caregivers was greater in the cognitively impaired. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted during June 2007 to March 2008 in Hong Kong, and 707 community-dwelling elders aged 65 and above and 705 family caregivers were interviewed. Cognitively impaired elders were over-sampled to give reliable estimates for that sub-group. A structural questionnaire was used to collect data on preference for residential care and potential factors. Logistic regression was used to identify the predictors. Results: More cognitively impaired elder-caregiver dyads (37.4%) had disagreement in preference for residential care than cognitively intact elder-caregiver dyads (20.5%) ( p<.001). From the elders' perspective, less preference for residential care was associated with cognitive impairment, whereas greater preference was associated with depression (for cognitively intact elders), more usage of community service and functional impairment. From the caregivers' perspective, greater preference for residential care was associated with greater caregiver burden, or care-recipients having cognitive or functional impairment, or more usage of community services. Conclusions: Cognitively intact elders were more likely to indicate preference for residential care than cognitively impaired elders. Elders, both cognitively intact and impaired, were less likely than their caregivers to indicate preference for residential care. Disagreement in preference for residential care between the elders and their caregivers was larger for the cognitively impaired group than the cognitively intact group. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2010, v. 25 n. 1, p. 46-54 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.2296
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.2296
 
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1166
 
dc.identifier.epage54
 
dc.identifier.hkuros158577
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273514500007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust
Funding Information:

This study is part of the project entitled 'CADENZA: A Jockey Club Initiative for Seniors' funded by The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust.

 
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230
2012 Impact Factor: 2.977
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.086
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19551703
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-75349105365
 
dc.identifier.spage46
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59244
 
dc.identifier.volume25
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
 
dc.subjectCaregiver burden
 
dc.subjectCognitive impairment
 
dc.subjectDepression
 
dc.subjectElders
 
dc.subjectOld age home
 
dc.subjectResidential care
 
dc.titleDisagreement in preference for residential care between family caregivers and elders is greater among cognitively impaired elders group than cognitively intact elders group
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chan, F</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hui, E</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Objectives: This study examined the predictive factors of preference for residential care in cognitively intact and impaired elders and their family caregivers. It was hypothesized that disagreement in preference for residential care between the elders and their caregivers was greater in the cognitively impaired. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted during June 2007 to March 2008 in Hong Kong, and 707 community-dwelling elders aged 65 and above and 705 family caregivers were interviewed. Cognitively impaired elders were over-sampled to give reliable estimates for that sub-group. A structural questionnaire was used to collect data on preference for residential care and potential factors. Logistic regression was used to identify the predictors. Results: More cognitively impaired elder-caregiver dyads (37.4%) had disagreement in preference for residential care than cognitively intact elder-caregiver dyads (20.5%) ( p&lt;.001). From the elders&apos; perspective, less preference for residential care was associated with cognitive impairment, whereas greater preference was associated with depression (for cognitively intact elders), more usage of community service and functional impairment. From the caregivers&apos; perspective, greater preference for residential care was associated with greater caregiver burden, or care-recipients having cognitive or functional impairment, or more usage of community services. Conclusions: Cognitively intact elders were more likely to indicate preference for residential care than cognitively impaired elders. Elders, both cognitively intact and impaired, were less likely than their caregivers to indicate preference for residential care. Disagreement in preference for residential care between the elders and their caregivers was larger for the cognitively impaired group than the cognitively intact group. Copyright &#169; 2009 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Shatin Hospital
  3. Chinese University of Hong Kong