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Article: Complications of traditional Chinese/herbal medicines (TCM)-a guide for perplexed oncologists and other cancer caregivers

TitleComplications of traditional Chinese/herbal medicines (TCM)-a guide for perplexed oncologists and other cancer caregivers
Authors
KeywordsCancer chemotherapy
Complementary and alternative medicine
Drug toxicity
Herbs
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00520/index.htm
Citation
Supportive Care In Cancer, 2009, v. 17 n. 3, p. 231-240 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Cancer patients often seek complementary or alternative medicines to supplement or replace treatments prescribed by licensed medical practitioners. Traditional Chinese/herbal medicine (TCM) is a popular complementary intervention among cancer patients of Asian ethnicity, many of whom take it during their conventional treatment. Few of these patients inform their doctors, however, creating a risk of unexpected sequelae arising from either pharmacologic toxicity, unsuitable dosing, interactions with anti-cancer drugs or other medications, adulteration, or idiosyncratic reactions. If unrecognized, these problems may be misattributed to conventional treatment toxicity or disease progression, and remedial action may be inappropriate or delayed. Goals of work: The purpose of this review is to help oncologists recognize the common presentations of TCM-related problems in cancer patients-such as abnormal liver function tests, unexpectedly severe myelosuppression, hemostatic defects, renal functional impairment, or suspected drug interactions-and to teach strategies by which these problems can be anticipated, prevented, or managed. Conclusion: Through sensitive understanding of the reasons favoring TCM usage, oncologists can gain the trust and respect of their TCM-using patients while ensuring the safety and efficacy of conventional anticancer treatments. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59237
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.535
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.267
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorEpstein, RJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:45:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:45:52Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSupportive Care In Cancer, 2009, v. 17 n. 3, p. 231-240en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0941-4355en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59237-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Cancer patients often seek complementary or alternative medicines to supplement or replace treatments prescribed by licensed medical practitioners. Traditional Chinese/herbal medicine (TCM) is a popular complementary intervention among cancer patients of Asian ethnicity, many of whom take it during their conventional treatment. Few of these patients inform their doctors, however, creating a risk of unexpected sequelae arising from either pharmacologic toxicity, unsuitable dosing, interactions with anti-cancer drugs or other medications, adulteration, or idiosyncratic reactions. If unrecognized, these problems may be misattributed to conventional treatment toxicity or disease progression, and remedial action may be inappropriate or delayed. Goals of work: The purpose of this review is to help oncologists recognize the common presentations of TCM-related problems in cancer patients-such as abnormal liver function tests, unexpectedly severe myelosuppression, hemostatic defects, renal functional impairment, or suspected drug interactions-and to teach strategies by which these problems can be anticipated, prevented, or managed. Conclusion: Through sensitive understanding of the reasons favoring TCM usage, oncologists can gain the trust and respect of their TCM-using patients while ensuring the safety and efficacy of conventional anticancer treatments. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00520/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSupportive Care in Canceren_HK
dc.subjectCancer chemotherapyen_HK
dc.subjectComplementary and alternative medicineen_HK
dc.subjectDrug toxicityen_HK
dc.subjectHerbsen_HK
dc.titleComplications of traditional Chinese/herbal medicines (TCM)-a guide for perplexed oncologists and other cancer caregiversen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYau, T: tyaucc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailEpstein, RJ: repstein@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYau, T=rp01466en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityEpstein, RJ=rp00501en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00520-008-0526-xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19009311-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-59449105535en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros162825en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-59449105535&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage231en_HK
dc.identifier.epage240en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262990000003-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, J=36887309300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, T=23391533100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEpstein, RJ=34975074500en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3633194-

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