File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: Use of antibiotics by primary care doctors in Hong Kong

TitleUse of antibiotics by primary care doctors in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherBioMed Central. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apfmj.com/archive
Citation
Asia Pacific Family Medicine, 2009, v. 8 n. 1, article no. 5 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the use of antibiotics by primary care doctors. METHODS: General practitioners in Hong Kong were invited to fill in a short questionnaire on every patient with infection that they had seen on the first full working day once every three months for four consecutive quarters starting from December 2005. RESULTS: Forty six primary care doctors took part and a total of 3096 completed questionnaires were returned. The top three diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (46.7%), gastrointestinal infection (8.2%) and pharyngitis (7.1%). Thirty percent of patient encounters with infections were prescribed antibiotics but only 5.2% of patient encounters with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) were prescribed antibiotics. Amino-penicillins were the most commonly used antibiotics while beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations (BLBLIs) were the second most commonly used antibiotics and they accounted for 16.5% and 14.0% of all antibiotics used respectively. Of all patients or their carers, those who demanded or wished for antibiotics were far more likely to be prescribed antibiotics (Pearson chi-square test, p < 0.0001). Those patients who were attending the doctors for follow-up consultations were also more likely to be prescribed antibiotics (Pearson chi-square test, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The antibiotic prescribing patterns of primary care doctors in Hong Kong are broadly similar to primary care doctors in other developed countries but a relatively low rate of antibiotics is used for URTI.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59233
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.227
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, TPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, PLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorYung, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:45:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:45:46Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAsia Pacific Family Medicine, 2009, v. 8 n. 1, article no. 5en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1447-056Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59233-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the use of antibiotics by primary care doctors. METHODS: General practitioners in Hong Kong were invited to fill in a short questionnaire on every patient with infection that they had seen on the first full working day once every three months for four consecutive quarters starting from December 2005. RESULTS: Forty six primary care doctors took part and a total of 3096 completed questionnaires were returned. The top three diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (46.7%), gastrointestinal infection (8.2%) and pharyngitis (7.1%). Thirty percent of patient encounters with infections were prescribed antibiotics but only 5.2% of patient encounters with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) were prescribed antibiotics. Amino-penicillins were the most commonly used antibiotics while beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations (BLBLIs) were the second most commonly used antibiotics and they accounted for 16.5% and 14.0% of all antibiotics used respectively. Of all patients or their carers, those who demanded or wished for antibiotics were far more likely to be prescribed antibiotics (Pearson chi-square test, p < 0.0001). Those patients who were attending the doctors for follow-up consultations were also more likely to be prescribed antibiotics (Pearson chi-square test, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The antibiotic prescribing patterns of primary care doctors in Hong Kong are broadly similar to primary care doctors in other developed countries but a relatively low rate of antibiotics is used for URTI.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBioMed Central. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apfmj.com/archiveen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAsia Pacific Family Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsAsia Pacific Family Medicine. Copyright © BioMed Central.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleUse of antibiotics by primary care doctors in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1444-1683&volume=8&issue=1&spage=5&epage=&date=2009&atitle=Use+of+antibiotics+by+primary+care+doctors+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TP: tplam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL: plho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KF: hrntlkf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TP=rp00386en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KF=rp00718en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1447-056X-8-5-
dc.identifier.pmid19460171-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2692843-
dc.identifier.hkuros157224en_HK
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 5-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 5-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats