File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Depression literacy among Chinese stroke survivors

TitleDepression literacy among Chinese stroke survivors
Authors
KeywordsDepression after stroke
Depression literacy
Mental health
Older adults
Issue Date2009
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13607863.asp
Citation
Aging And Mental Health, 2009, v. 13 n. 3, p. 349-356 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Mental health literacy is fundamental to the pursuit of health. Little is known about patients' literacy levels regarding depression even though it is common among elderly stroke survivors. This paper will report the level of mental health literacy and thematic constructs of depression interpreted by a group of stroke survivors. Method: Qualitative data on patients' understanding of 'depression' in Chinese were translated and analyzed by an academic and a researcher separately to identify emerging constructs using a thematic approach. Out of 214 ischemic stroke older adults, aged 50+, 85 were able to explain the term in their own words after their first stroke attack. Results: The majority of stroke patients (60%, 129 out of 214) had never heard of depression and only four referred to it as a medical disease. Only a third would like to learn more about depression. Older Chinese adults depicted depression mainly by using words in the cognitive and affective domains, but the descriptors used were mostly non-specific and might not match the diagnostic criteria for depression or the commonly used screening tools. Conclusion: Low mental health literacy among older patients indicated that much more work needs to be done in health promotion and education on depression literacy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59196
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.861
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.967
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, ACKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, SWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, GKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, RTFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:44:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:44:51Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAging And Mental Health, 2009, v. 13 n. 3, p. 349-356en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1360-7863en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59196-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Mental health literacy is fundamental to the pursuit of health. Little is known about patients' literacy levels regarding depression even though it is common among elderly stroke survivors. This paper will report the level of mental health literacy and thematic constructs of depression interpreted by a group of stroke survivors. Method: Qualitative data on patients' understanding of 'depression' in Chinese were translated and analyzed by an academic and a researcher separately to identify emerging constructs using a thematic approach. Out of 214 ischemic stroke older adults, aged 50+, 85 were able to explain the term in their own words after their first stroke attack. Results: The majority of stroke patients (60%, 129 out of 214) had never heard of depression and only four referred to it as a medical disease. Only a third would like to learn more about depression. Older Chinese adults depicted depression mainly by using words in the cognitive and affective domains, but the descriptors used were mostly non-specific and might not match the diagnostic criteria for depression or the commonly used screening tools. Conclusion: Low mental health literacy among older patients indicated that much more work needs to be done in health promotion and education on depression literacy.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13607863.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAging and Mental Healthen_HK
dc.subjectDepression after strokeen_HK
dc.subjectDepression literacyen_HK
dc.subjectMental healthen_HK
dc.subjectOlder adultsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDepression - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitationen_HK
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMental Healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshStroke - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitationen_HK
dc.subject.meshSurvivorsen_HK
dc.titleDepression literacy among Chinese stroke survivorsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1360-7863&volume=13&spage=3&epage=&date=2009&atitle=Depression+literacy+among+Chinese+stroke+survivorsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, ACK: acklee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, SSK: sleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, RTF: rtcheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, ACK=rp00463en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, SSK=rp00493en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, RTF=rp00434en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13607860802636230en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19484598en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67949085225en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros159991en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67949085225&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage349en_HK
dc.identifier.epage356en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266489900005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, ACK=21834051800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, SW=23968420300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, SSK=7202044879en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, GKK=21835274200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, RTF=7202397498en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats