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Article: Obstructive sleep apnea and the metabolic syndrome
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TitleObstructive sleep apnea and the metabolic syndrome
 
AuthorsLam, JCM1
Ip, MSM1
 
KeywordsGlucose metabolism
Hypertension
Metabolic syndrome
Obstructive sleep apnea
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherExpert Reviews Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.future-drugs.com/page/journal/ers/teaser
 
CitationExpert Review Of Respiratory Medicine, 2009, v. 3 n. 2, p. 177-186 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/ers.09.10
 
AbstractObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the metabolic syndrome have a strong association with each other owing to their common feature of obesity, but an association independent of obesity has been demonstrated in several studies. There is also evidence, of varying strengths, from epidemiologic and clinical studies, for the independent association between OSA and individual core components of the metabolic syndrome, including hypertension, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. To date, the data are strongest for hypertension, while data for adverse glucose or lipid metabolism are more controversial. Obesity and other factors, such as alcohol drinking and smoking, obviously pose major confounding hurdles to the clarification of the causal or aggravational role of OSA on cardiometabolic risks. Recurrent episodes of obstructed breathing notably result in intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation, and these may in turn lead to many adverse body responses, including sympathetic activation, neurohumeral changes and inflammation, which are the seeds for cardiometabolic dysfunctions, such as atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus. Evidence from translational studies or animal/cell work are forthcoming in the delineation of these pathogenetic mechanisms. © 2009 Expert Reviews Ltd.
 
ISSN1747-6348
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.862
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1586/ers.09.10
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, JCM
 
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSM
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:44:18Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:44:18Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the metabolic syndrome have a strong association with each other owing to their common feature of obesity, but an association independent of obesity has been demonstrated in several studies. There is also evidence, of varying strengths, from epidemiologic and clinical studies, for the independent association between OSA and individual core components of the metabolic syndrome, including hypertension, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. To date, the data are strongest for hypertension, while data for adverse glucose or lipid metabolism are more controversial. Obesity and other factors, such as alcohol drinking and smoking, obviously pose major confounding hurdles to the clarification of the causal or aggravational role of OSA on cardiometabolic risks. Recurrent episodes of obstructed breathing notably result in intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation, and these may in turn lead to many adverse body responses, including sympathetic activation, neurohumeral changes and inflammation, which are the seeds for cardiometabolic dysfunctions, such as atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus. Evidence from translational studies or animal/cell work are forthcoming in the delineation of these pathogenetic mechanisms. © 2009 Expert Reviews Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationExpert Review Of Respiratory Medicine, 2009, v. 3 n. 2, p. 177-186 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/ers.09.10
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1586/ers.09.10
 
dc.identifier.epage186
 
dc.identifier.hkuros162715
 
dc.identifier.issn1747-6348
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.862
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69949154199
 
dc.identifier.spage177
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59173
 
dc.identifier.volume3
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherExpert Reviews Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.future-drugs.com/page/journal/ers/teaser
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofExpert Review of Respiratory Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectGlucose metabolism
 
dc.subjectHypertension
 
dc.subjectMetabolic syndrome
 
dc.subjectObstructive sleep apnea
 
dc.titleObstructive sleep apnea and the metabolic syndrome
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong