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Article: Natural ventilation for reducing airborne infection in hospitals
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TitleNatural ventilation for reducing airborne infection in hospitals
 
AuthorsQian, H2 1
Li, Y1
Seto, WH3
Ching, P3
Ching, WH1
Sun, HQ1
 
KeywordsInfection control
Isolation room
Natural ventilation
Ventilation rate
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
 
CitationBuilding And Environment, 2010, v. 45 n. 3, p. 559-565 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2009.07.011
 
AbstractHigh ventilation rate is shown to be effective for reducing cross-infection risk of airborne diseases in hospitals and isolation rooms. Natural ventilation can deliver much higher ventilation rate than mechanical ventilation in an energy-efficient manner. This paper reports a field measurement of naturally ventilated hospital wards in Hong Kong and presents a possibility of using natural ventilation for infection control in hospital wards. Our measurements showed that natural ventilation could achieve high ventilation rates especially when both the windows and the doors were open in a ward. The highest ventilation rate recorded in our study was 69.0 ACH. The airflow pattern and the airflow direction were found to be unstable in some measurements with large openings. Mechanical fans were installed in a ward window to create a negative pressure difference. Measurements showed that the negative pressure difference was negligible with large openings but the overall airflow was controlled in the expected direction. When all the openings were closed and the exhaust fans were turned on, a reasonable negative pressure was created although the air temperature was uncontrolled. The high ventilation rate provided by natural ventilation can reduce cross-infection of airborne diseases, and thus it is recommended for consideration of use in appropriate hospital wards for infection control. Our results also demonstrated a possibility of converting an existing ward using natural ventilation to a temporary isolation room through installing mechanical exhaust fans. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN0360-1323
2013 Impact Factor: 2.700
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.634
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2009.07.011
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000272307700005
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaHKU 7115/04E
Health, Welfare and Food Bureau, Hong Kong SAR GovernmentHA-NS-002
Funding Information:

The work described in this paper was supported jointly by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU 7115/04E) and a Hospital Authority-commissioned project under the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RFCID) by the Health, Welfare and Food Bureau (Project No. HA-NS-002), Hong Kong SAR Government.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsDispersion and ventilation control of exhalation pollutants in hospital wards
Understanding droplets due to the use of nebulizers and respiratory activities
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorQian, H
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorSeto, WH
 
dc.contributor.authorChing, P
 
dc.contributor.authorChing, WH
 
dc.contributor.authorSun, HQ
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:41:43Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:41:43Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractHigh ventilation rate is shown to be effective for reducing cross-infection risk of airborne diseases in hospitals and isolation rooms. Natural ventilation can deliver much higher ventilation rate than mechanical ventilation in an energy-efficient manner. This paper reports a field measurement of naturally ventilated hospital wards in Hong Kong and presents a possibility of using natural ventilation for infection control in hospital wards. Our measurements showed that natural ventilation could achieve high ventilation rates especially when both the windows and the doors were open in a ward. The highest ventilation rate recorded in our study was 69.0 ACH. The airflow pattern and the airflow direction were found to be unstable in some measurements with large openings. Mechanical fans were installed in a ward window to create a negative pressure difference. Measurements showed that the negative pressure difference was negligible with large openings but the overall airflow was controlled in the expected direction. When all the openings were closed and the exhaust fans were turned on, a reasonable negative pressure was created although the air temperature was uncontrolled. The high ventilation rate provided by natural ventilation can reduce cross-infection of airborne diseases, and thus it is recommended for consideration of use in appropriate hospital wards for infection control. Our results also demonstrated a possibility of converting an existing ward using natural ventilation to a temporary isolation room through installing mechanical exhaust fans. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBuilding And Environment, 2010, v. 45 n. 3, p. 559-565 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2009.07.011
 
dc.identifier.citeulike5352348
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2009.07.011
 
dc.identifier.epage565
 
dc.identifier.hkuros161294
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192415
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272307700005
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaHKU 7115/04E
Health, Welfare and Food Bureau, Hong Kong SAR GovernmentHA-NS-002
Funding Information:

The work described in this paper was supported jointly by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU 7115/04E) and a Hospital Authority-commissioned project under the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RFCID) by the Health, Welfare and Food Bureau (Project No. HA-NS-002), Hong Kong SAR Government.

 
dc.identifier.issn0360-1323
2013 Impact Factor: 2.700
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.634
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70350583069
 
dc.identifier.spage559
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59031
 
dc.identifier.volume45
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBuilding and Environment
 
dc.relation.projectDispersion and ventilation control of exhalation pollutants in hospital wards
 
dc.relation.projectUnderstanding droplets due to the use of nebulizers and respiratory activities
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectInfection control
 
dc.subjectIsolation room
 
dc.subjectNatural ventilation
 
dc.subjectVentilation rate
 
dc.titleNatural ventilation for reducing airborne infection in hospitals
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Southeast University
  3. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong