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Article: In vitro degradation and protein adsorption characteristics of PHBV/PLLA blends and PHBV/PLLA-based tissue engineering scaffolds

TitleIn vitro degradation and protein adsorption characteristics of PHBV/PLLA blends and PHBV/PLLA-based tissue engineering scaffolds
Authors
KeywordsComposite
Degradation
Hydroxyapatite
Nanoparticle
PHBV
PLLA
Polymer blend
Protein adsorption
Scaffold
Issue Date2008
PublisherTrans Tech Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.scitec.ch/1022-6680/
Citation
Advanced Materials Research, 2008, v. 47-50 PART 2, p. 1399-1402 How to Cite?
AbstractPoly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) was used to make composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering in our previous studies. To control the degradation rate and process of composite scaffolds, PHBV was blended with poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA), which has a much higher degradation rate than PHBV, and PHBV/PLLA blends were used as polymer matrices for composite scaffolds. Composite scaffolds based on these blends and containing nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nHA) were fabricated using an emulsion freezing / freeze-drying technique. Non-porous films of PHBV/PLLA blends were prepared using the solvent casting method. In vitro degradation tests of non-porous PHBV/PLLA blends and porous composite scaffolds were conducted by immersing samples in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for various periods of time. It was found that the composition of polymer blends affected water uptake of films and scaffolds. For PHBV/PLLA-based scaffolds, the incorporated nHA particles also significantly increased water uptake within the initial immersion time. Both PHBV/PLLA blends and composite scaffolds underwent rapid weight losses within the first few weeks. The degradation of composite scaffolds arose from the dissolution of nHA particles and degradation of the PLLA component of polymer blends. Composite scaffolds exhibited enhanced adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein, in the current study. © 2008 Trans Tech Publications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59000
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.115
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSultana, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:41:11Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:41:11Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAdvanced Materials Research, 2008, v. 47-50 PART 2, p. 1399-1402en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1022-6680en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59000-
dc.description.abstractPoly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) was used to make composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering in our previous studies. To control the degradation rate and process of composite scaffolds, PHBV was blended with poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA), which has a much higher degradation rate than PHBV, and PHBV/PLLA blends were used as polymer matrices for composite scaffolds. Composite scaffolds based on these blends and containing nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nHA) were fabricated using an emulsion freezing / freeze-drying technique. Non-porous films of PHBV/PLLA blends were prepared using the solvent casting method. In vitro degradation tests of non-porous PHBV/PLLA blends and porous composite scaffolds were conducted by immersing samples in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for various periods of time. It was found that the composition of polymer blends affected water uptake of films and scaffolds. For PHBV/PLLA-based scaffolds, the incorporated nHA particles also significantly increased water uptake within the initial immersion time. Both PHBV/PLLA blends and composite scaffolds underwent rapid weight losses within the first few weeks. The degradation of composite scaffolds arose from the dissolution of nHA particles and degradation of the PLLA component of polymer blends. Composite scaffolds exhibited enhanced adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein, in the current study. © 2008 Trans Tech Publications.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherTrans Tech Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.scitec.ch/1022-6680/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAdvanced Materials Researchen_HK
dc.subjectCompositeen_HK
dc.subjectDegradationen_HK
dc.subjectHydroxyapatiteen_HK
dc.subjectNanoparticleen_HK
dc.subjectPHBVen_HK
dc.subjectPLLAen_HK
dc.subjectPolymer blenden_HK
dc.subjectProtein adsorptionen_HK
dc.subjectScaffolden_HK
dc.titleIn vitro degradation and protein adsorption characteristics of PHBV/PLLA blends and PHBV/PLLA-based tissue engineering scaffoldsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, M:memwang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, M=rp00185en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-56349099892en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros157736en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-56349099892&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume47-50 PART 2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1399en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1402en_HK
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSultana, N=15849681300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=15749714100en_HK

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