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Article: The Moral Theologian, Oliver O'Donovan and International Law

TitleThe Moral Theologian, Oliver O'Donovan and International Law
Authors
KeywordsContractarianism
Identity
International law
Moral theology
Nationalism
Issue Date2008
PublisherEquinox Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.equinoxjournals.com/ojs/index.php/PT
Citation
Political Theology, 2008, v. 9 n. 3, p. 339-362 How to Cite?
AbstractOliver O'Donovan renders a singular contribution to the theory and history of international law by identifying the spiritual impoverishment of the discipline following the triumph of state-centred contractarianism in the theory of international relations, with Hobbes, Locke, Kant and, for the present, John Rawls. This contractarian approach to international society has an inherent tendency, which O'Donovan highlights, to ground international order in the hegemonic claim of one or two countries to represent the values of the whole of humanity. With a combination of rational moral theology and biblical interpretation (Revelation), O'Donovan reasserts an international order grounded in the autonomous identities of the nations, which God has recognized as equal. With a theory of political legitimacy which rests upon representation of national identity, O'Donovan points the way to an international order based upon mutual respect among nations under natural law, in the classical medieval sense finally represented by Grotius and Suarez. This article describes again what the natural law tradition meant in the hands of Aquinas and Vitoria, in order to highlight the fact that the ontological dimension of natural law theory provides a way to meet the intolerable insecurities which theories of nationalism appear to generate. Then the article goes on to offer one way to bring natural law thinking up to date for contemporary audiences by drawing upon Paul Ricoeur's phenomenological theory of mutual recognition and respect among the nations as a way of going beyond the contractarian tradition in contemporary international law and relations theory.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58934
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.111

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCarty, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:39:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:39:47Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPolitical Theology, 2008, v. 9 n. 3, p. 339-362en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1462-317Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58934-
dc.description.abstractOliver O'Donovan renders a singular contribution to the theory and history of international law by identifying the spiritual impoverishment of the discipline following the triumph of state-centred contractarianism in the theory of international relations, with Hobbes, Locke, Kant and, for the present, John Rawls. This contractarian approach to international society has an inherent tendency, which O'Donovan highlights, to ground international order in the hegemonic claim of one or two countries to represent the values of the whole of humanity. With a combination of rational moral theology and biblical interpretation (Revelation), O'Donovan reasserts an international order grounded in the autonomous identities of the nations, which God has recognized as equal. With a theory of political legitimacy which rests upon representation of national identity, O'Donovan points the way to an international order based upon mutual respect among nations under natural law, in the classical medieval sense finally represented by Grotius and Suarez. This article describes again what the natural law tradition meant in the hands of Aquinas and Vitoria, in order to highlight the fact that the ontological dimension of natural law theory provides a way to meet the intolerable insecurities which theories of nationalism appear to generate. Then the article goes on to offer one way to bring natural law thinking up to date for contemporary audiences by drawing upon Paul Ricoeur's phenomenological theory of mutual recognition and respect among the nations as a way of going beyond the contractarian tradition in contemporary international law and relations theory.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherEquinox Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.equinoxjournals.com/ojs/index.php/PTen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPolitical Theologyen_HK
dc.subjectContractarianism-
dc.subjectIdentity-
dc.subjectInternational law-
dc.subjectMoral theology-
dc.subjectNationalism-
dc.titleThe Moral Theologian, Oliver O'Donovan and International Lawen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=ISSN 1462-317X&volume=9 &issue=3&spage=339&epage=362&date=2008&atitle=The+Moral+Theologian,+Oliver+O%27Donovan+and+International+Lawen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCarty, A: tcarty@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCarty, JA=rp01239en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1558/poth.v9i3.339-
dc.identifier.hkuros166190en_HK
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage339-
dc.identifier.epage362-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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